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10 customers and horrible sales!

clshirk

Member
Apr 16, 2007
296
0
I just did a show tonight, around 10 people came, only 3 had even been to a PC show before. And walked out with only $170 in sales!!! There are 3 more pending orders out, but I was so embarrassed.

The show was kinda disorganized. Show was to start at 7pm. The hostess wanted to make a veggie pizza before the show started and then another one during the show, but she was behind so we started the pizza like just before 7, so the first few guests helped us put it together. Then there was a lot of mingling and the hostess (who was once a consultant herself) wanted to wait until all her friends got there to start, which was around 7:30pm. So I finally get everyone in one area together and start my talk. We have already finished the pizza by then.
Then we make Mom's Apple Crisp. I get lots of help making it, but still kinda disorganized b/c of all the talking, mingling, etc...
I had a lot of questions, I answered a lot. Finally showed off the cutlery, stoneware, and cookware. Didn't impress many. Was wierd b/c I'm usually doing great with these items. Hardly had anyone in the crowd pop up and talk about the products they owned, which I think helps a show.

I just felt like the show took forever and was very frustrated with the sales. I think the hostess was too.

Sorry, just needed to vent.
 

brendaziz

Member
Jan 1, 2010
88
0
I'm sorry :(
Bad shows def happen and I just try to see everything for the median. I'll have great ones, good ones and not so good ones but it should all balance in the end.

Also, weird b/c one of my worst shows was a former consultant. I don't know what it was, but just was not great.
I'm sorry you didn't enjoy yourself and have great sales.
Next show try to focus on having fun and being a little more organized (my WORST problem!!!!) and the next one WILL be better!
 

Sheila

Legend Member
Gold Member
Mar 26, 2008
5,375
75
I wonder if she told them to "just come & have fun, you don't have to buy anything!" ???

I had a show that was at about $300 at the end of the event. While cleaning up to leave, I was a bit bummed. She had 9 guests so I was expecting it to be a bit higher. But the last 2 guests to leave each booked a show & I gave out recruiting brochures to one of them. The host's show ended up closing at $950! :D The first booking is this next weekend and that host is super hyped. The other booking is holding her show 2 weekends away but I don't get Commissionable Sales out of it because I'm giving the show to the host who is waiting until 2 days before the show to sign as my new recruit!!! (What I recommended so that she can maximize her 30/90 day earnings with other bookings off this show)

Just encourage your current host to keep collecting orders! You never know were it might lead!!!

And remember, some of the worst hosts make GREAT recruits! ;) My recruiter said she was a horrible host, but she did great at PC & was a Director until medical issues forced her to give it up.

My averages are a bit higher out here because everyone on the military base has at least one guaranteed income in the house, so the job security is there. My average show is $888 right now ($941.08 if you count the ones I gave to new recruits). So when I walk away with a $300 show, I'm a tad disappointed. BUT, I've also ended up (months later) with a recruit from a "low" show ... so even if you don't walk away happy right now, thing could change 2-6 months down the road to make you happy that you were there that day. :D
 

chefsteph07

Legacy Member
Jul 18, 2007
3,206
7
I'd just be happy it qualified.
I've had shows like that and left w/ $50 in sales.
 

scottcooks

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Jul 7, 2005
1,937
98
It'll be the start of something big. DO great customer follow up and big MAC calls and you'll see a bigger business!
 

clshirk

Member
Apr 16, 2007
296
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  • Thread starter
  • #6
Thanks guys. Very encouraging that its not just me. I have really high expectations for myself.

Dh thinks I just didn't cook something that made use of high dollar products except the DCB, but somehow I couldn't wow anyone with it.
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
I think we all have shows like that sometimes. I've had shows where I just wasn't "in the zone", and I was disorganized and scattered.
I've also had shows where I did everything right, and the sales still weren't there. It happens. I remember a party where there were a ton of people there, and I was sure it would be a great show....but everyone who ordered placed an order under $30, and several left without placing orders...come to find out, that week, a major employer in the town had announced that there were going to be major layoffs coming, so although everyone came to the party, they were all under a cloud of fear about the layoffs. Then I understood why people weren't buying, and no one booked, even though they all seemed to be having a great time.
 

ChefKelebel

Member
Jan 18, 2009
153
2
don't feel bad, I had one show (it was for a really good friend too, I was excited, she did it as a housewarming and invited a ton of people) where I did two recipes (paid for ingredients myself as it was a dear friend) and all the guests had a really great time, they kept coming up to me telling me how fun this was and how neat all the tools were. And then at the end, I handed out the catalogs and one of them stepped forward and said (in words to this effect), "we know how these things work, everyone buys products so "hostess" can get so much in free product, so we all just chipped in and are giving "hostess" the "free product value" from us as her housewarming gift."
So hostess used that money (total about $90) and got "free stuff" (from her friends, not me) and I didn't even end up with enough to make it a real show, it turned out to be an individual order. ARGH! These people were from her crowd in a different city and I didn't know anyone there, not one booking or lead, looking back I feel like they were treating me like her caterer. I was really bummed about that, it was one of my very first shows.

Thanks for the vent, I had forgotten about that one! LOL!!:)
 

ChefMary412

Advanced Member
Mar 28, 2008
631
0
We have all been there... sometimes we are out of it as consultants and sometime hosts do say "don't feel like you have to buy, just come for fun"... that has happened to me a few times. Which is fine, but it gives the party a different mood. And sometimes people have not seen each other in a while or they are work friends and don't get together out of work often... and this is their time to openly talk and mingle.
That happened to my show Friday night... a bunch of people who work together, but had not hung out in a while. NO ONE wanted to watch me cook the fajitas... so I asked that everyone come in for the salad chopper part... half did and no one was really impressed...

And I had a show of 30 people with the sales that were just over $300... you will have a huge show next time...
at least your show qualified... one of two shows to earning a HWC apron.:)
 

PCJenni

Veteran Member
Apr 10, 2007
1,040
3
  • #10
It happens at everyone. I had a show Friday night where there were 10 guests and when I left it was 94.50 in sales. YUCK!!! Don't get down on yourself, sometimes it has nothing to do with us!
 

millthayer

Member
Gold Member
Mar 3, 2006
70
0
  • #11
Know what you mean....had a similar show within my first 6 mo of my business...the hostess said it would be a couples party and there would be tons of people there so could we make 2 pizzas and a dessert? Ok, made one ahead of time, demoed the 2nd one and had the men make the Pumpkin cake in the microwave in the bundt pan! There were 38 guests and only 8 orders! Come to find out the host has pizza night once a month and she told everyone that I was making supper and they didnt need to buy anything! Of course alot of the men had great suggestions for me and on one of my door prize slips, someone who didnt put their name on it, decided to insult me!!! I was horrified...we closed her show after a week at about $390. and I have learned that some you win and some you don't!!! Just go onto the next party and forget about the bad one!!! Bless & release!!!!:p
 

sandilou

Advanced Member
Silver Member
Oct 9, 2009
514
8
  • #12
Former consultants can be THE WORST hosts! Before we started doing interactive, I arrived at a host's home (x-consultant), and she informed me she had changed her mind about which recipe to do -- WHAT?!? :yuck::mad: We gathered up what we could from her OLD tools and made it work. Oh -- on top of that, most of the guests were teachers -- 2nd worst! They talked all through the demo (which maybe was a good thing b/c I was totally unprepared! :D)

Sandi
 

clshirk

Member
Apr 16, 2007
296
0
  • Thread starter
  • #13
You guys are all great. This was the perfect place to vent.
I asked one of the girls who was at the show last night when I saw her this morning if she enjoyed it...being it was her first ever PC show. She said it was the best show she had ever been to. She said there was obviously a lot of chatter going on though. But she's really burned out on initials.inc, southern living, mary kay parties that have nobody show up, that she is hesitant to host one. I'm still gonna hope she might this summer.
 

PampChefDeb

Member
Jun 18, 2007
160
0
  • #14
I am so glad I got on here tonight, at least for a few minutes.
This is why...
I've been depressed about my show from this last Friday night, and you all have made me feel better about it now.
Had about 8 guests, and they were all soooo excited and had so much fun! Almost all of them thanked me and said what a great time they had!! Got 2, yes only TWO, orders! And they totalled a whopping $49 in comm sales. Luckily, one of the hosts (there were 2, co-hosting) had collected some outside orders so the total sales are at about $153 right now.
No one has booked a show yet. A few of them were discussing it during the show. I did ask a couple of the ladies and one said she was thinking about it but had to ask her husband cause he doesnt like people at his house. The other said she is soooo busy and ended up sounding like no way would she have time to host. I was at the host's home for at least 4 hours. Whew!
Anyway....thanks for all the comments and encouragement! Like many of you said....sometimes things just go that way and you just have to move on...
Plan on closing the show Wed, the 14th so I will keep my spirits up and think positively!!
 

gailz2

Senior Member
Gold Member
Jun 1, 2007
2,018
10
  • #15
Like everyone else, I have had some bad shows. This year, actually in Feb., I started offering a free cookbook (from me) for anyone who had 6 outside orders when I arrived. I have given out 2 so far (the 6 orders more than make up for the cookbook cost, which I add to the host's order).
 

Sheila

Legend Member
Gold Member
Mar 26, 2008
5,375
75
  • #16
Debbie, I think your two guests would be prime candidates to participate in a Mystery Host Catalog Show! :D
 

AJPratt

Legend Member
Silver Member
Oct 11, 2005
6,681
5
  • #17
I had a show where when I left I had about $100 in orders and wound up with it ending at $450 from outside sales.
 

murkey

Member
Sep 26, 2008
134
0
  • #18
I had a show where everyone was THRILLED! Happy, joyful, laughing, interactive. They asked questions, asked about the products, warranties on things... the works. I thought it would be a decent show - 11 people showed up.

I handed out catalogs. NOBODY even cracked a catalog! They just ate (my food! it was a promotion where I bought the food) and talked. I sat and chatted, asked if there were any questions...the works. they all said, "no" we're good.

Net sales NOTHING. NOT a SINGLE purchase!!! I was so shocked. The hostess basically used ME as an excuse to have friends over, on MY dime. It almost killed my desire to continue with PC.

Thankfully that is few and far between. It is NOT you... hugs!! :)
 

ChefKelebel

Member
Jan 18, 2009
153
2
  • #19
ooh, since I'm on a vent path right now...I did one show for my SIL (well, now she's my ex-SIL) where she invited exactly 4 people (all showed up) and then when I finished my demo (which I paid for all ingredients, because she was family), and went to hand out catalogs, my SIL-Dearest said to her guests, "oh, you don't have to buy anything! :eek: I just want to thank you for coming" I almost croaked right there on her. :yuck: And then when everyone left, she had the nerve to say to me, "I think that went really well, didn't it?" :blushing: ZERO sales. :mad: Not even a sale from her. Boy am I glad that day is over. :grumpy:
 

Gina M

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Jan 13, 2006
1,778
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  • #20
I once had a show - drove 1 1/2 hours on a Sunday afternoon - host was expecting around 15 guests. Get there - only her mom is there - we wait a half hour - one guest arrives. Everyone else blew off the host - no calls - nothing! She was so bummed. Her 2 guests order $46 worth of product (her mom only ordered the measure all cup and wanted to add it to the host's order - she told her no!). Host got a bunch of outside orders and ended at $650 for the show! I felt so bad for her but she figured out a way to get her free product anyhow. I always think if the hosts are motivated for free products - they will get those outside orders - if they aren't then - bless and release!
 

pampchefsarah

Senior Member
Gold Member
Mar 24, 2008
2,203
2
  • #21
You all have made me feel better about my show last night!! I wasn't expecting a huge crowd, since only 6 people RSVP'd, but figured it would at least be a decent show. My last few shows, though fun, have had really low sales, because I allow, I think, too much 'visiting,' and not enough participating. I figured this gave guests too much of an impression it's a get together, and so they don't really pay attention to the products. So, I decided last night's show would be more organized, and I'd make it completely interactive. Had it all planned out in my head, and it should have not only worked out beautifully, but I should have been out the door in under 2 hours.

Well, you know what they say "man plans, God laughs." I'm sure His sides were hurting last night. Except for the host's mother, EVERY SINGLE GUEST WAS LATE, one of them over an hour!! Fortunately, as soon as I started setting up, I told the host we would start the flip cake as soon as the first couple of guest got there, so when I suggested we start, she pulled those two guests into the kitchen. By the way, quick reminder, if you're planning to do use the Fluted Stone and/or the DCB, be sure to ask the host ahead of time if her microwave is big enough!! I can't believe this happened AGAIN. The cake totally failed, because, even after 20 minutes, it wouldn't cook properly (evenly). I was able to do the meat and chili part of the Chipotle Chili Cornbread Bake in the microwave, but we used the oven to bake the cornbread topping.

Anyway, the show is at $213 right now, so at least it qualifies, and I have two future bookings (although, one isn't until October, probably). I told the host we can close on Wednesday, and hopefully we'll get the show to $250.00. Oh, by the way, I was there for 4 hours! I couldn't believe it - CCCB, Slap Yo' Mama Margaritas (which she had made ahead of time), and the flip cake, no reason I should have been there that long, except for all the visiting.
 
Mar 8, 2010
8
0
  • #22
past consultants are the WORST! I just had one last week, and she is a sweet lady and a dear friend - and you would think they would know how to host one of these things, right? NO WAY! I learned when it comes to past consultants you have to have MAJOR host coaching. They expect things to go a certain way & want their friends to have fun. I let her know that LOTS of things have changed, including the tools, since she was a consultant. She just expected me to have certain tools with me. I told her the reason I sent her a grocery list was because I can't bring EVERYTHING and so if she added something to the list then she is in charge of figuring out how to make it work. (I'm really nice about it though!)
One thing I do to keep down the chatter is I put one of the guests (I usually pick someone who is chatty already) in charge of the recipe. I tell her "make sure everyone can hear you! You have the floor!" (teachers are good at this job too - haha) and the guest can usually keep the others under control if your hostess isn't doing a good job about it. I also give out tickets for a drawing for participation - this keeps everyone involved too. To get people there on time I offer an on time drawing.
My show is currently at $850 & she has more outside orders to give me, so it can happen! Don't get to down... just think of your shows that have been successful!
 

cookinfletch

Member
Gold Member
Nov 30, 2009
141
0
  • #23
I had a show recently where I locked my keys in my car in the Kroger parking lot an hour before the show was to start & couldn't reach my DH right away. When I did, it took him almost 45mins to get to me w/ my other key (he drives the speed limit!). I got to the show, calmed down, set up (noone was on time), & did fine, but then the host's whole family came into the house- kids, grandkids, etc. What a circus- I left the house 3 1/2 hrs after arriving! It was an ok show, & the host was very understanding, but still- why try to have a show when you are also inviting everyone over for Sunday dinner?
 

Careyann

Member
Gold Member
Jan 27, 2010
184
0
  • #24
I'm a little offended! ;) (Kidding!)
I was a partylite consultant first, did that for 2 years, did pretty good team leader all that. Ran out of time for it, then I went to a Pampered Chef party and did 2 a year as a hostess for a few years, then decided to sell. Quit again after 2 years and having my hostess pool run dry. Still would host parties and I was the best hostess ever! :D I always had high sales and pretty good attendance, maybe the difference in me was that I knew how it worked and knew what I could get if I could get the sales. The show I had before I decided to become a consultant again was over $1000, my first ever as a hostess! I looked at that and thought "I should be getting this paycheck!!"
So I do have to object to the comment that past consultants are the worst hostess, because I am pretty sure I'd be an exception to that rule!! LOL!
 

scottcooks

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Jul 7, 2005
1,937
98
  • #25
It all comes down to you coaching the host. If you do that well, she expects what you expect - a big crowd and a bigger list of invitees. If you do not do that, she disappoints you with either low sales or low turnout or both. Top sellers are repeatedly top at host coaching!

"Past consultants are the worst" when we abandon them thinking, 'they know all of this'. It is a simple business but is not simple to execute! Follow through!
 

AJPratt

Legend Member
Silver Member
Oct 11, 2005
6,681
5
  • #26
I'm a little offended! ;) (Kidding!)
I was a partylite consultant first, did that for 2 years, did pretty good team leader all that. Ran out of time for it, then I went to a Pampered Chef party and did 2 a year as a hostess for a few years, then decided to sell. Quit again after 2 years and having my hostess pool run dry. Still would host parties and I was the best hostess ever! :D I always had high sales and pretty good attendance, maybe the difference in me was that I knew how it worked and knew what I could get if I could get the sales. The show I had before I decided to become a consultant again was over $1000, my first ever as a hostess! I looked at that and thought "I should be getting this paycheck!!"
So I do have to object to the comment that past consultants are the worst hostess, because I am pretty sure I'd be an exception to that rule!! LOL!


IMHO, I think it depends on what kind of consultant the host was, or the personality. If he or she was a motivated consultant (like you were), I think they can be motivated hosts. Otherwise, you have to realy put on your host coaching hat!
 

Careyann

Member
Gold Member
Jan 27, 2010
184
0
  • #27
That's probably true, I didn't need any host coaching when I did shows, I just knew what needed to be done and ran with it. I was that way with any party I do for somebody. It's harder now to do parties for other companies since my schedule is so full with PC and I really need to be excited about their product to be motivated enough to put the effort in. No one has the host benefits we do and it's kind of disappointing to do all the work and not get the payoff your used to seeing with PC.
 
Mar 28, 2010
12
0
  • #28
Has anyone tried to make a brief announcement before the demo, asking guests to keep the chit-chat to a minimum?

I'm thinking something along these lines:
"I know that you’re all excited to be out of the house and if you’re anything like me and my girlfriends, you don’t get to see one another very often and you have some catching up to do. All I ask is that you keep the chatter to a minimum during the demonstration part as there are guests here who do want to hear about the products and I'm not very good at talking over people. I promise there will be plenty of time a little later in the evening for you to share the latest gossip."

I've had two $1k+ shows that were great sales-wise but terrible as far as people talking during the demo. One show, there was an entire group of women that stood with their backs to me and talked through the whole thing. It had me all flustered and I kept losing my train of thought. So frustrating.
 

esavvymom

Legend Member
Staff member
Sep 8, 2008
7,895
146
  • #29
Just knowing how I would react if a consultant did that at a show I was attending- even if I wasn't the one chatting....it would be a huge turn-off to me. So knowing what I would think - then I probably wouldn't do it myself. They are adults, and they ARE out to have a fun evening- and honestly, I know listening to ME probably won't rank as high as chatting with some friends. Now, I have a time or two had to literally stop talking and I'd just smile- the group had gotten SO LOUD that no one could hear me, not even the ones who were trying and sitting close to my table! Otherwise, that's about as far as I've ever taken it.
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
  • #30
Just knowing how I would react if a consultant did that at a show I was attending- even if I wasn't the one chatting....it would be a huge turn-off to me. So knowing what I would think - then I probably wouldn't do it myself. They are adults, and they ARE out to have a fun evening- and honestly, I know listening to ME probably won't rank as high as chatting with some friends. Now, I have a time or two had to literally stop talking and I'd just smile- the group had gotten SO LOUD that no one could hear me, not even the ones who were trying and sitting close to my table! Otherwise, that's about as far as I've ever taken it.

Yes.

In fact, I say the opposite of telling them to listen. I let them them know that I know they are there for food, fun, and friends, and that I'm not the PC Police, or their teacher, so I won't be going after them if they talk during the demo. The ones who want to listen will figure out a way to listen, and the ones who want to chat need to be able to do that - it's a PARTY!

I once had a party with a really wild group, and the host after the party thanked me for putting up with them, and letting them have fun. She told me about a party they'd had with another consultant, and that consultant had "shooshed" them all during the demo. She said they all started whispering about it - "did she just shoosh us?" "Is she treating us like children?", etc...they were quiet for the rest of the demo, but the fun was gone from the evening. Most of them bought just a little, and no one booked. The consultant probably walked away thinking it was because they were all talking so much, but in reality, it was because they all felt very offended by her behavior towards them.
At the party I did, I had great sales, and 3 bookings!

If everyone had fun, then I would consider the party a success. Do you want them to remember the fun they had, or the lecture they received about being quiet during your demo?
 
Mar 28, 2010
12
0
  • #31
ahhhh very good points.

thank you for your input! i'm VERY new at this still.
 
Mar 28, 2010
12
0
  • #33
My 18 month old daughter has severe food allergies & she was diagnosed in september. So now everything I cook (at home) is gluten, soy, nut, egg & dairy free.
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
  • #34
My 18 month old daughter has severe food allergies & she was diagnosed in september. So now everything I cook (at home) is gluten, soy, nut, egg & dairy free.

Gotcha. My son wasn't allergic to any of the normal things. His allergies were to carrots, sweet potatoes, and cantaloupe. Anything orange. He seems to have outgrown it now.

I had a friend whose baby daughter had severe egg and nut allergies - she's in K-garten now, and the allergies are gone! Have they said that's a possibility for your daughter?
 

esavvymom

Legend Member
Staff member
Sep 8, 2008
7,895
146
  • #35
My 18 month old daughter has severe food allergies & she was diagnosed in september. So now everything I cook (at home) is gluten, soy, nut, egg & dairy free.

AND you have time to be a consultant? Hats off to you!! I have a friend who has a lot of allergies- none life threatening, but she and her girls are allergic to about all of those things you mentioned and it makes them sick....it was a lot of work helping her figure it out! I can't imagine doing it everyday.
 

pampchefsarah

Senior Member
Gold Member
Mar 24, 2008
2,203
2
  • #36
My 18 month old daughter has severe food allergies & she was diagnosed in september. So now everything I cook (at home) is gluten, soy, nut, egg & dairy free.

Whoot! Now we know who to ask when we have hosts looking for these types of recipes.
 
Mar 28, 2010
12
0
  • #37
The trouble comes with keeping my kitchen tools seperate from my kit tools. Because obviously, i have to worry about things like cross contamination and can't just prepare allergen free recipes for my shows. I have two large bar pans and have to really scrub down anything I use at home and at shows.

When I demo the 30 minute chicken, I mix the spices ahead of time and just use gluten free flour. No one knows the difference and it keeps my DCB allergen free.

I actually have a lot of food sensitivities myself so I haven't been able to try ANY of the PC recipes that I've demonstrated. I have to just trust people when they say they're good.

And yes, we're very hopeful that my daughter will outgrow some of her allergies. Her peanut allergy is life-threatening and not likely to go away but there is hope for the rest of them. We go for re-testing in a couple months.
 

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