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2 Questions Direct Sellers Need to Stop Asking

In summary, this article provides advice on how to ask questions in a way that is more likely to result in a booking or sale. The advice is to focus on offering instead of asking.

esavvymom

Staff member
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This is an article from Direct Seller Speaker, Julie Anne Jones.
(Click on the title of the article below, if you want to go to her website for more info, etc. I am not affiliated with her, but do try to give credit where it's due.
)


2 Questions Direct Sellers Need to STOP Asking
By Julie
on June 10, 2014

One of the main concepts I teach is that it's not about you when it comes to your direct sales business. I truly believe that when you focus all of your energy on making it all about others (your hosts, guests at your parties, your team members), you always get what you need.


That's why I hate the questions, "Would you like to book a party with me?" and "Would you like to learn more about my opportunity?"



Now, before you get crazy, I'm not suggesting that you stop offering the chance to book a party with you or learn about your opportunity. Just think about it for a second. Who are both of those questions about? You, right? There's nothing in either one of them that makes me feel like you're making it about me AT ALL. Plus, just from a purely practical standpoint, they're also closed-ended questions (meaning they can be answered with a yes or no). That usually leaves you no place to go when it comes to overcoming objections and supporting the person in seeing what's possible.



So, if you can't ask those questions, how do you book home parties and build your direct sales team? By making a shift from asking to offering. It's really that simple. When you frame your question as an offer instead, you shift the focus from what's in it for you to what's in it for the person to whom you're making the offer. Here's how that sounds:



Renee, I want you as one of my June hosts! I cannot believe how much you added to the party tonight! You are fun! Let’s look at our schedules and see when we can get together. Which week works best for you?”



“Marilyn, I couldn’t stop thinking about our conversation earlier tonight and how completely busy you said you’ve been. I think you need a break, and I’d be absolutely honored if you would let me be the one to set it up for you. Let’s figure out when we can find a time to get you and your friends together. What does your calendar look like next month?”



“Sue, it was great talking with you earlier tonight. I so appreciated your honesty about your daycare situation and I could really relate. I couldn’t stop thinking about your situation and I’d love to buy you a cup of coffee and share with you what I love about what I do. How does next week look?”



“Sarah, Mary and I were talking before her party tonight and she told me she thought you would be great at what I do. I have to tell you, after your participation during the party, I have to agree. I swear, you know more about my product than I do! I’d love to get together and share with you what I love about my job. Would you rather do coffee or lunch?”



See how easy that is? You're still using a question, but now it's an open ended question proceeded by lots of acknowledgement. And it's clear that you're more interested in her needs than your own.



I'm wondering how you feel about this and whether or not you think you can make this shift in your business. I'd love it if you would share below.



Ready for a fresh start in your direct sales business? Grab my "Direct Sales Starter Kit" to kick start your plan. It's yours for free when you subscribe to my mailing list. Already a member? My system won't add you twice, so go ahead and grab the starter kit anyhow. Click here to subscribe to my mailing list.



P.S. I took the above scripts from my e-book "Powerful Language for Direct Sales Success; 12 Scripts Tell You Exactly What to Say to Get the Booking, Sponsoring, and Sales Results You've Always Dreamed of." It's one of my most popular products.
 
Great tips! Thanks for sharing! Anyone have more?
 
Admin Greg said:
Great tips! Thanks for sharing! Anyone have more?
The basic point of the first message is to avoid "yes / no" questions. (Sales 101)
 
Check it out here

Dear Julie Anne Jones,I couldn't agree more with your perspective on shifting from asking to offering when it comes to booking parties and building a team. As a pampered chef consultant, I have found that offering the opportunity and focusing on the potential host or team member's needs and desires is much more effective than simply asking for a booking or opportunity. It shows that we truly care about their needs and are not just looking to make a sale.I have also used your scripts in my own business and have seen great success in connecting with potential hosts and team members. It's amazing how a simple shift in language can make all the difference in building relationships and creating a positive experience for everyone involved.Thank you for sharing your valuable insights and for reminding us that it's not about us, but about making it all about others. I look forward to continuing to learn from you and incorporating your strategies into my business.Best,
 

1. Why do I need to stop asking certain questions as a direct seller?

As a direct seller, it's important to build a relationship with your customers and potential clients. Asking certain questions can come off as pushy or salesy, which can turn people off and harm your business. It's important to focus on building trust and offering value instead of solely trying to make a sale.

2. What are some examples of questions I should avoid asking?

Questions that focus solely on the sale, such as "Are you ready to buy this product?" or "How many of this item are you going to purchase?" should be avoided. Questions that put pressure on the customer or make them feel uncomfortable can also harm your business. Instead, focus on building a conversation and offering helpful information about your products or services.

3. How can I build a relationship with my customers without being pushy?

Building a relationship with your customers involves getting to know them and their needs. Instead of asking direct sales questions, try asking open-ended questions that allow your customers to share more about themselves and their interests. This can help you better understand their needs and provide them with personalized recommendations.

4. Can I still make sales without asking certain questions?

Yes, absolutely! In fact, by not asking certain questions, you may actually see an increase in your sales. Building a relationship with your customers and providing them with value and helpful information will make them more likely to trust you and purchase from you.

5. What should I focus on instead of asking sales questions?

Focus on building trust and offering value. This can include providing helpful tips and information about your products, sharing personal experiences or success stories, and genuinely getting to know your customers. By building a relationship with them, they will be more likely to trust your recommendations and make a purchase.

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