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Selling Pampered Chef: My First Party Experience

In summary, this person's party had very low sales due to the fact that none of the first timers ordered anything.
jendill
Gold Member
140
I've been selling Pampered Chef for 2 years now and experienced a first. There were 8 guests at my party tonight and only 2 placed orders for a whopping $54 in sales! Thankfully the host worked hard to collect outside orders and the party is at $254. Most of the guests were first timers and I was so excited to share the products with them! NONE of the first timers ordered anything. They raved about the soup and then left the recipe. They LOVED the Queen of the shoppers game, and wanted all the products we talked about. They even participated in the Demo. I can't help but take it personally. There were kids running everywhere and no counter space for a demonstration, but I really thought it was going to be a great show. I want to follow up, but don't want to be the pushy consultant. I always send a thanks for attending email and did that again with a personal message for each guest about a conversation I had with each of them. Now what?
 
I'm at my 2 year mark also and had the same thing happen only the host didn't get outside sales. It took four days and several phone calls to get the show to $150. And it was 2 1/2 hour drive from my house. It hurts (in the pocket book!) but remember the simple little Qtip and Quit Taking It Personally (I love that saying because it is such a good reminder to me to let things go!).
After 130 shows if that is the worst that ever happens it's a whole lot better than being in commercial real estate and having multi-million dollar deals fall out & I used to take that very personally.
I LOVE this business! My income (right now) is far less than I used to make but I sleep at night! And as my team grows so does my income.
Let it go and let's go book some more shows. My calendar isn't where I want it. If you would like a challenge - let's both book 2 more shows this month and make up for the crazies!
 
Jeans Garden said:
I'm at my 2 year mark also and had the same thing happen only the host didn't get outside sales. It took four days and several phone calls to get the show to $150. And it was 2 1/2 hour drive from my house. It hurts (in the pocket book!) but remember the simple little Qtip and Quit Taking It Personally (I love that saying because it is such a good reminder to me to let things go!).
After 130 shows if that is the worst that ever happens it's a whole lot better than being in commercial real estate and having multi-million dollar deals fall out & I used to take that very personally.
I LOVE this business! My income (right now) is far less than I used to make but I sleep at night! And as my team grows so does my income.
Let it go and let's go book some more shows. My calendar isn't where I want it. If you would like a challenge - let's both book 2 more shows this month and make up for the crazies!

I got burned before driving 2 hours for a show that never happened - biggest reason why I will only drive an hour from my town now!
 
You should follow up with the guest and let them know that you are looking for ways to improve your show and you want to know what they liked best and what you could improve upon. This way you are asking them for their opinon and who does not like to GIVE that! Most likely you will find that finances is the issue and it will give you the oportunity to offer to get them free products by hosting their own show. Worth a shot...
 
Since they all seemed to love the products, I'd ask each one to host a show so they can earn the products for free. Perhaps their own friends will purchase more.
 
Ever had a show where NO ONE ordered? Yeah, that one sucks too!
 
I think sometimes hosts go overboard with the "just come for fun, you don't have to order anything" with their friends. I try to discourage them from saying this, because then it can lead to problems like this. I mean, I have hosted parties and told one or two friends not to worry about ordering, just to come, but certainly did not use that as my main way of getting folks there. Anyone have tips on how to nicely tell guests or hosts that people should order if they come for the party and eat the food and enjoy their time? I mean we have so many things that folks can get for under $20, including their shipping! I don't spend less than $20 whenever I go out for fun with friends.....
 
Did you talk to the host before you left to find why so few ordered? Did they not have money? Did they not know they were coming to shop? Did your host care that sales were so low? I'm sure I'll offend someone, but were they all from the same ethnic/cultural group? They may not be familiar with the home party concept or think they can get everything cheaper at Walmart. Or it was just a play group/mom's day out with refreshments provided by you? If I'm driving more than an hour I stress the requirement for 10 confirmed guests plus outside orders.
 
These are all good suggestions. I have another that really helped me. Change your definition of success.The show was a legitimate show, so that's not an issue like it was for Linda. (Yeah, I've had that, too.)Shortly after I became a consultant nearly 8 years ago, I had two shows within about a month of each other. The first was for my very wealthy aunt and her friends. I just knew this was going to be a whiz-bang show. I was looking forward to it breaking my "so-far" records. The second was with a very sweet woman who lives in a trailer in the middle of nowhere (which describes a lot of my hosts, since I live in the geographical center of nowhere myself). I knew she didn't have a lot of spare money and neither did most of the people who would be attending. So, I was prepared for a low show. (This was back before we had the $150 minimum. A show could simply be 5 orders.)So, my aunt's show was decent. It was just shy of $500, which was about average for me. But, I was disappointed because it wasn't a blow-out. The other show was over $800. Being the analytical person I am, I sat down and thought about what I do and why. I decided that I put far too much emphasis on the dollar amount of a show. Even a good show was disappointing if it didn't meet my expectations. I adjusted my attitude. Beginning that day, I changed my definition. A successful show is one at which everyone has a good time and at least one person learns something. Now every show I do is successful. Changing my attitude and definition changed the way I approached shows. I wasn't focused on the sales, so it didn't feel like I was pressuring people to order. My sales increased as a result.
 
  • #10
Who here remembers when it was 5 orders to make a qualified show? The worst qualified show of 5 orders I ever had was $38, lol!!!

Oh the good ol' days. VA
 
  • #11
Pamperedva said:
Who here remembers when it was 5 orders to make a qualified show? The worst qualified show of 5 orders I ever had was $38, lol!!!

Oh the good ol' days. VA

I remember those days. I don't miss the points system one bit thought! Hosts spending hours trying to figure out how to make their points come out exactly right. That was not fun!
 
  • #12
Yeah. My worse was 70 miles one way for a $60 show. ...but the bookings from the show did make it worth it!
 
  • #13
I've had shows with 20 people, and 2 orders; and i've showed up for a party of 2 people. Overall, in the 300 shows I've had, 2 of them had 2 guests. BOTH of these shows, ONE of the guest booked and in one of them, the 2nd guest signed up as a consultant. You can go along way with one on one attention. So my advises, is to not count your show off because of low attendance...it could lead to something else.
 
  • #14
It's good to analyze yourself every once in awhile, but remember that this just happens sometimes. Maybe it happened to remind you that there really isn't a requirement for people to buy things at every show and help you to appreciate your other successes. If this isn't a downward trend in your shows, I wouldn't let it bother you too much. Most consultants have had shows like this.

If you have bookings off this show, I would try to figure out if something did go wrong and really encourage your new host to invite new people as well as collect outside orders before the show.
 
  • Thread starter
  • #15
The host shared that she thinks I am a "natural" and is appreciative of my patience with the ciaos that was the show! Now to figure out how the next party with this same group will go differently!
 
  • #16
Yep! Been there, done that, DON'T have the paycheck! I had a Bridal Show and even the bride didn't attend!
 
  • #17
jeanlewis13 said:
Yep! Been there, done that, DON'T have the paycheck! I had a Bridal Show and even the bride didn't attend!

Oh my goodness!! That's awful!
 
  • #18
That's so funny - I had a bridal shower once where both the bride and the maid of honor were there but both thought the other was doing the inviting so no-one came!! I DO remember the $125 or 5 orders makes a show and the three quarter hour epic phone calls whilst the host (hostess in those days!!) decides on how to spend the last 50 points (equivalent to $1.00!) the good old days!
 
  • #19
Okay, on a bridal show note.. I had a bridal show where everyone bought her nighties and such. I did my demo and everything, handed out catalogs only to have only one guest order (an aunt) who wanted it send to herself NOT the bride. I felt like they thought I should would just cater it. Called the aunt after the show and we added it to a different show. BTW- the one gift she did get at the shower that wasn't naughty was Ginsu knives.
 
  • #20
Rae is right. Success is a mere term to which WE can put the definition. I have had shows were I served 20 people and have not gotten one single order, I have had shows where I had two guests but over $1200 in outside orders. I have had shows with 35 to 40 people who were so drunk that once the food was made, some one threw up all over the table. I even had a show where the night before the best friend of the hostess, killed himself in her front yard. No I am not kidding! After 12 years, any show that I make it through without killing someone, even myself is a success. One booking, any amount of sales or even just looking at it as good practice, makes it a success. Especially because I always remember that if I did my host coaching, did the correct sales pitch to the guests, it has never been my fault. 99.9999% of the time it is NOT something you did wrong. You can not force anyone to buy or book. It is just not possible. Unless you have the power to get into some else's mind, it ain't gonna happen. So you have to know that it usually is not your fault. So take anything positive and make that your success for that show.
 
  • #21
BethCooks4U said:
Yeah. My worse was 70 miles one way for a $60 show. ...but the bookings from the show did make it worth it!

This is another way you can change your definition of success...I had a show the beginning of this year that only totaled $75 before I left the host's home. The host had tried really hard to get people there, some were sick and 2 people there didn't order at all. I got 2 bookings, one of which was a fundraiser, and 2 recruit leads. I feel this party was a success. The crowd at this party simply didn't have a lot of money. It ended as a success though because the host received some things she wanted for free, and she will have her booking benefit. Also, they will be able to gain extra income when they sign as consultants.
 
  • #22
Just a little note on what Rae said...like Doris Christopher says to never pre-judge! Also, I would never call the hostess up and ask what you did wrong or if she could give you some suggestions. No matter what, you did your best and you can't help that her friends didn't order. Maybe they didnt have the money or really didnt have the need for our products, but don't take it personally, its not your fault. Shake it off and go on to the next show! Good luck!
 
  • #23
Wow, John - way to bring perspective! Hang in there, all. Fortunately, they are not all like this! I do follow up if no one purchases, with an insistant tone and ask each guests after they report how much fun they had, when they will be scheduling their own show so they can have that kind of fun with their friends?Most often poor show sales are the result of the coulda-woulda-shoulda Consultant Blues. I take full responsibility - when I host coach beautifully, the show is smoother and everyone knows what to expect. When I just 'trust' the host, even past consultants, then I get low sales and oddball circumstances (host bouncing a check or bad ccard).Best of luck to everyone. Don't get hung up on a bad show - they will happen from time to time. Consider them 'seasoning' for you as a veteran, informative, successful Pampered Chef Consultant!
 
  • #24
Rae is right.

My favorite 3-word phrase. ;)

I remember you talking about that show, John. We can only do what we can do. It's when we have expectations about things we cannot control that we become disappointed.
 

Related to Selling Pampered Chef: My First Party Experience

1. What is "My First Party Experience" with Pampered Chef?

"My First Party Experience" is a program designed for new Pampered Chef consultants to help them successfully launch their business. It includes step-by-step guidance on how to plan and host their first party, as well as tips and tricks for selling Pampered Chef products.

2. Do I need to have any prior experience in sales to participate in "My First Party Experience"?

No, you do not need any prior sales experience to participate in "My First Party Experience". The program is designed to teach you everything you need to know about selling Pampered Chef products and hosting successful parties.

3. How much does it cost to participate in "My First Party Experience"?

The "My First Party Experience" program is completely free for Pampered Chef consultants. It is a part of the training and support provided by Pampered Chef to help new consultants succeed in their business.

4. What kind of support can I expect to receive during "My First Party Experience"?

During "My First Party Experience", you will have access to training materials, resources, and a mentor who will guide you through the process of planning and hosting your first party. You will also have the opportunity to connect with other new consultants for support and advice.

5. Can I continue to use the skills and knowledge learned in "My First Party Experience" for future parties?

Absolutely! The skills and knowledge you gain from "My First Party Experience" are essential for hosting successful parties with Pampered Chef. You can continue to apply these skills to future parties and events to grow your business.

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