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Pampered Chef: Newbie here! One of my customers has the following

  1. Lifeat50

    Lifeat50 Member

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    0
    Newbie here!

    One of my customers has the following questions....

    "I thought I sealed my new large round stone but I cooked frozen pizza on it last night and it stuck pretty good. I cleaned it off the best I could and then sealed it. Will it be ok?"

    Please help me out!!!:chef:
     
    May 18, 2009
    #1
  2. etteluap70PC

    etteluap70PC Legacy Member Gold Member

    3,667
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    Re: Stones

    Seasoning is a long process...

    look thru the files here... there are some good info sheets on stoneware.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #2
  3. wadesgirl

    wadesgirl Legend Member Gold Member

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    Re: Stones

    Sealed it... What does she exactly mean, I would ask her that and then like Paulette said make sure to talk to her about seasoning her stoneware.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #3
  4. Re: Stones

    Here is the seasoning recipe another Cheffer here gave us (below)

    (wonder how she "sealed" it after she cleaned off the pizza)


     
  5. etteluap70PC

    etteluap70PC Legacy Member Gold Member

    3,667
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    Re: Stones

    I wondered about this too... Definetly find out what she did!
     
    May 18, 2009
    #5
  6. NooraK

    NooraK Legend Member Gold Member

    5,884
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    Re: Stones

    Does anyone know what HO says about this? I mean, it doesn't seem like they'd have anything against it, but I am curious...
     
    May 18, 2009
    #6
  7. Re: Stones

    Do you mean as far as do they recommend this? I'm not sure.
     
  8. ChefPaulaB

    ChefPaulaB Veteran Member

    1,386
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    Re: Stones

    You have to be careful with that on flat stones, the mix can run off in the oven...
     
    May 18, 2009
    #8
  9. etteluap70PC

    etteluap70PC Legacy Member Gold Member

    3,667
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    Re: Stones

    Not sure what HO say's but I do not do this. Here is my reasoning...

    While PC stones has super fine poores so normally the seasoning stays on the top layer, you do not want oil "soaking into the stone" this is what can cause cracks and yucky smelling stones.

    Truthfully if you just do a batch or 2 of cookies especially chocchip or oatmeal you will get your stone off to a great start.

    Thats just my .02$. I will not tell you that you CANNOT do this it is just MY choice.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #9
  10. cmdtrgd

    cmdtrgd Legacy Member Gold Member

    4,969
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    Re: Stones

    Cook bacon in the oven (400 degrees for about 30 minutes) on any stone with sides that you want to season. The fluted pan works best with the spray with flour.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #10
  11. babywings76

    babywings76 Legend Member Gold Member

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    Re: Stones

    I did that seasoning recipe for my fluted stone, but really didn't think it was any better than just brushing oil on it before using it. It's "seasoning" layer is just the same as other stones I've done with just using it. Really, I like how we can say that you don't have to do anything special to it. Just grease it and use it. Gradually, it will season. In the meantime, try to cook things with more fat content. Flat stones I used to do cookies and crescent rolls, rings, braids, etc.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #11
  12. Re: Stones

    Mmmmmm I just started cooking bacon on the stone and I have to say it's a winner for so many reasons (here's where I begin to sound like a commercial)

    1. We like crispy bacon in my family, and this gets it
    2. It cooks evenly, no crispy, soft fat sections
    3. I don't have to baby sit it.
    4. It makes having prepared bacon possible without a lot of effort.
     
  13. Re: Stones

    Absolutely true...I just shared it because someone else posted it and I've come to realize that some customers prefer to have a one step "procedure" for things and this lady seems like one of them
     
  14. babywings76

    babywings76 Legend Member Gold Member

    7,305
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    Re: Stones

    I don't think it even does soak into the stone. Our stones don't do that, supposedly. ;)
     
    May 18, 2009
    #14
  15. wadesgirl

    wadesgirl Legend Member Gold Member

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    Re: Stones

    HO does not recommend that as far as I know. The stoneware naturally seasons over time but you want to oil it the first few times and then with other things that don't create their own grease for a while.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #15
  16. DebbieJ

    DebbieJ Legend Member

    10,901
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    Re: Stones

    Seal it? What is she talking about?

    I recommend that my customers cook high fat foods the first few times to get the seasoning started and beyond that, there is NOTHING that needs to be done. The seasoning takes time and there is no magic concoction that will have it done instantly.

    Occasionally, brushing lightly with oil (NO PAM--makes it sticky!) helps the food not stick if it's not high in fat and the stone is not well seasoned yet.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #16
  17. ChefPaulaB

    ChefPaulaB Veteran Member

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    Re: Stones

    Hmmm, I haven't the greatest luck with the bacon. Seemed to take forever and still didn't get crispy, and after I made bacon a couple times in my LBP I've had sticky issues on the outside bottom of the pan. So now I make bacon on the stovetop and we make the pancakes in the LBP in the oven. Works much better for us that way... wish that I could get the bacon to work, but oh well....
     
    May 18, 2009
    #17
  18. Jolie_Paradoxe

    Jolie_Paradoxe Senior Member Gold Member

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    Re: Stones

    I'm too lazy to season it....so I just let it become "non-stick" with time....

    Also, with much time and use....the "oil/fat" will seep into the stone. Had a customer whose rectangular baker broke....she's had it for almost 10 years....you could see how penetrated the stone was....kind of cool to look at.

    The pizza may have gotten "stuck" because some cheese slipped underneath....or there was some food particles left from a previous meal....make sure she scrapes really well after each use....non stick sprays can also create sticky residues.....all theories....I would just tell her not to worry and let her know "sealing" can be done, but isn't necessary. Make sure she isn't "sealing" like our parents had to do for wooden boards and cast iron skillets.
     
  19. etteluap70PC

    etteluap70PC Legacy Member Gold Member

    3,667
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    Re: Stones

    If it seems to seep thru to the bottom so it is sticky you have hairline cracks and need to get it replaced.

    For sticky stones use a paset of baking soda a nd water. Works like a charm!
     
    May 18, 2009
    #19
  20. etteluap70PC

    etteluap70PC Legacy Member Gold Member

    3,667
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    Re: Stones

    This is actually not good...
     
    May 18, 2009
    #20
  21. wadesgirl

    wadesgirl Legend Member Gold Member

    11,440
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    Re: Stones

    This is caused from hairline fractures in the stoneware, it's not seeping in.
     
    May 18, 2009
    #21
  22. ChefPaulaB

    ChefPaulaB Veteran Member

    1,386
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    Re: Stones

    Okay, if this is the case, will I have to send the whole thing back? And will they need proof, I've only ever had to send back broken stones... not sure about doing one that is sticky on the bottom... and should I try the baking soda paste first to see if that's the case or not?
     
    May 18, 2009
    #22
  23. esavvymom

    esavvymom Legend Member Staff Member

    7,885
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    Re: Stones

    See, my director had a stone that was as old- it was nearly PURE BLACK. THe stone was broken, and on the inside, it was as clean and new-colored as a brand new stone. There were no signs of seepage anywhere. I've heard our stones do NOT absorb/soak in the juice/oils, etc- because that was one reason I've heard it's ok to have raw meat on them- since they don't absorb the raw meat juice. Time for me to check out the online training again and see if it says anything. :D
     
    May 18, 2009
    #23
  24. AnnieBee

    AnnieBee Veteran Member Gold Member

    1,358
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    Re: Stones

    ... but any raw meat juice would be cooked just as well as the meat itself!

    Granted, you might not want *any* juices/oils sitting inside your stone over the years! :)
     
    May 18, 2009
    #24
  25. Jolie_Paradoxe

    Jolie_Paradoxe Senior Member Gold Member

    2,878
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    Re: Stones


    Esavvy, you are correct that the oils should not seep into the stone. So don't think you need to re-train! LOL According to the P.I.G. on CC, "Our Stoneware is made from the highest quality natural clay for durability. Stoneware is virtually non-porous, so it doesn’t absorb oils and odors, and does not require pre-soaking. Stoneware evenly distributes heat and draws moisture away from the surface of the pan, resulting in crispier crusts, juicier meats, even browning and lighter baked goods.

    I just mentioned that a client's stone did have that seepage, and did not affect its use.

    Also, I highly recommend you do not rely on my "knowledge".....I only learned about PC in Nov of last year! lol

    Here is some of the info I have come across....course, it may not be accurate, so forgive me I mislead! :eek:

    Q: I keep hearing about seasoning but I really don't understand it. Help!

    A: With use, seasoning will naturally occur in Stoneware. Fats and oils are absorbed onto the surface of the stone. The seasoning forms a non-stick coating, making greasing almost obsolete.

    Q: My Baking Stone is sticky. Why?

    A: If a stone is over-oiled during the seasoning process, a sticky build-up can occur. This build-up can also cause food to stick to the stone. If this occurs, coat stone surface with a baking soda and water paste, let it sit for approximately 30 minutes and clean as usual.

    Q: What is the correct seasoning process?

    A: To start the seasoning process, simply use a vegetable oil spray for the three to five uses. Baking high fat content foods also helps with the natural seasoning process.

    Q: Is it possible for stoneware to become saturated and not absorb any more fat or oil from foods onto its surface? Would this affect the baking quality if the stoneware were saturated?

    A: The stoneware will gradually absorb fats and oils onto its surface to from a non-stick coating. The seasoning on the stoneware will not affect the baking quality. Moisture will still pass through a very seasoned stone and heat will continue to be distributed evenly.

    : Why does dish soap leave a flavor but garlic and fish don't?

    A: Soap or detergent works to actually form a bond with fats and oils. On our stoneware, fats and oils are part of the seasoning of the stone, so when you try to rinse the soap away, it has actually bonded to the surface seasoning making it difficult to remove. A soap taste may then exist during your next usage. When you bake food with strong odors and flavors, there is nothing in the food that binds to the stone or seasoning. Garlic, fish, onion, etc., are natural food products and do not adhere to the stone. That's why you can bake fish one night and cookies the next without having a "fishy" cookie taste.

    Q: If I'm not using soap to clean my stone, then how can it be clean?

    A: Soap does not kill bacteria. Soap (and detergent) when combined with water molecules penetrates the pores of food residue to soften it. This softening of food residue just makes it easier for the residue to be removed. Hot water alone makes oil and other food substances more fluid and therefore easier to dislodge, especially when used in combination with the nylon pan scraper. This rubbing action will effectively remove food residue.
     
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