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Pampered Chef: Info on Professional cookware/Generation II

  1. I am new to this. I will be having my first show in 10 days. I had a friend ask me if the cookware can be used on a flat surface stove. She had a pot that was smooth on the bottom and it kept making a popping noise. She only uses one with a coil on the bottom of the pan. Does PC have a smooth or coil surface on bottom? Has anyone used our cookware on a flat surface stove?
     
    Apr 30, 2005
    #1
  2. I have used PC cookware on my flat surface stove and not had a problem. I have gotten the popping noise when the bottom of the pan is wet. As long as the pan is dry not problems.
     
  3. pchefdonna

    pchefdonna Member

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    I have talked with the test kitchens on this question in the past, our cookware is made for stoves of all types, including flat surface. As a matter of fact, on the flat surface models I have looked at, the manufactures directions actually state NOT to use cookware with the coils in the bottom! Have your friend check the warranty book on her stove for confirmation!
     
    Apr 30, 2005
    #3
  4. DebPC

    DebPC Legacy Member Staff Member

    3,040
    407
    I have always had a flat stovetop and have used the Gen II and Proff. Set and both work awesome. Like the poster above I only get a popping sound when the pan bottom is wet.
     
    May 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Thanks

    Thank you girls for the information. It really helps.
     
    May 1, 2005
    #5
  6. PamperedGinger

    PamperedGinger Advanced Member

    707
    1
    Here is 2 fliers that compare our cookware to other brands. (know that wasn't the question, but thought it would work well here.) There are also 2 fliers giving info on our 2 brands.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Thanks

    Ginger-

    Thank you for the flyers. They are great. I learned alot from them and feel more comfortable talking about it at my future shows.
     
    May 1, 2005
    #7
  8. LuvStoneware

    LuvStoneware Member

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    I am always having people at my parties ask if these pots and pans are made with teflon. Does anyone know the answer of this question and why it seems to be such a big deal? Also what is the difference between the Generation and the Proffessional cookware other than the warranties?
     
    May 1, 2005
    #8
  9. PamperedGinger

    PamperedGinger Advanced Member

    707
    1
    There was a Dateline or one of those shows that did a piece on Telfon and nonstick pans.

    As far as differences between the 2 kind we carry, look at the post 2 above...there are 2 different files that tell the differences.
     
  10. LuvStoneware

    LuvStoneware Member

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    Do our pots and pans have teflon or is it that we use Dupont? I am sorry, I have heard of these words for cookware, but never knew what it was.
     
  11. PamperedGinger

    PamperedGinger Advanced Member

    707
    1
    http://missvickie.com/resources/cookware/1teflon.html
    *Info on teflon

    The TeflonĀ® trademark was coined by DuPont and registered in 1945; the first products were sold commercially under the trademark beginning in 1946. Applications and product innovations snowballed quickly. Marketed as non-stick and convenient, the term "Teflon" is now a household name. The nonstick pans, many of which are manufactured by DuPont, are a popular choice.

    On May 16, 2000, the 3M corporation stunned the rest of the chemical industry with an unexpected announcement: It had decided to stop producing a family of compounds used in Scotchgard, Teflon, and a host of other consumer products. Saying that the "perfluorochemicals" it had manufactured for half a century had been found to persist in human blood and wildlife, 3M portrayed its move as that of a conscientious corporate citizen.

    DuPont acknowledges that the fumes given off by non-stick coatings can also sicken people, in a condition called "polymer fume fever", which can be erroneously diagnosed as the common flu. No one has never studied the incidence of illness among users of the billions of non-stick pots and pans sold around the world, or the long-term effects from the sickness.

    While DuPont acknowledges that its nonstick coatings begin to deteriorate when the cookware reaches about 500 degrees, it notes that those temperatures are higher than typical cooking heats. And while it admits that birds may be harmed by the fumes, the company maintains that its pans are safe under normal use.

    Non-stick pans have never been meant for high-heat cooking, as the instructions on any pan label will show. "We recommend cooking using coated non-stick cookware at low to medium heat," says Dupont's Rich Angiullo. "We know (our product) can withstand temperatures up to 500 F, well above any of the recommended temperatures for frying or baking."
     
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