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Expert Tips for Hosting Engaging and Interactive Shows as a New Consultant

In summary, the new consultant does a 30 minute or less interactive show with the same recipe that her leader/director does. She does not feel comfortable and does not enjoy it. Her team suggested that she use the interactive part to actually prepare the recipe the guests are going to eat.
DianeM
6
I am a new consultant. I have had three parties so far. I have been doing the same show that my leader/director has done...which is a 30 minute or less interactive show. I make the recipe in advance of guests showing up (usually a DCB recipe and I also make potato chips then). Then we gather around the table and i pass around a bowl with a few pc items and have people come and try them. I don't know why but I am just not "feeling" it. I feel that I am not overly excited about these products and how to have people come up and use them (hard to explain here I think)..I just don't feel entirely comfortable. Can you guys tell me how you put on your shows, give me any pointers, ideas, etc? Thanks!!
 
The interactive show is great! I only do a couple of prep things before guests arrive, like make a dip with one of the rubs and sour cream/mayo. But for the actual recipe, I have everyone cook together and make the whole thing, start to finish. Ask people to share their own tips about tools (especially the stoneware!). I have the host hand out tickets, someone gets a ticket when they participate, ask a question, or share a cooking tip. I give them 2 tickets for asking questions about my job. Then either the person with the most tickets, or a random drawing, gets a prize (citrus peeler, pan scraper, quikut pairing knife, etc.) Go to the Online Training Center and listen to some of the interactive show workshops. Good luck!
 
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  • #3
Thank you for your tips. I guess I was probably not too clear. I don't mind the interactive part so much its just that the interactive part I am doing does not contribute the recipe I am making so it feels sort of weird to me. So you suggest that I use the interactive part to actually prepare the recipe the guests are going to eat, correct?
 
Are there any other consultant's who shows you can go see? I visited with a few other director's in our area and found one who's show felt very comfortable to me compared to the others. If not I know there use to be a DVD showing an interactive show. Not sure where to find it now (maybe on the supply order)
 
I always pick one guest to read the recipe we are making :)

I pick one or two guest to be my helpers (which I named them Vanna)

I usually have the host hand out name tags :)

I prep my ingredients for the recipe we are making just so it doesn't take as long to make it but I always prepare it with the guests watching and a couple helpers :)

I tend to sell what items I demo

Hope that helps some
 
I would recommend observing some other consultants shows - we (my upline and I) always encourage our teams to observe other people. Everyone's show is different, and you need to see that, and then get a feel for what makes you most comfortable. My director and I don't do shows alike AT ALL. And my upline above her is completely different from both of us, yet we are all successful. Be true to who you are and your personality!


(and for me - the interactive show doesn't work - I tried it for several months, and now I'm back to my own type of show!)
 
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  • #7
Thank you all for your ideas. Chef Becky, you say the interactive doesn't work for you. . . So what do you do at your show?
 
Interactive doesn't work for me either. I do my show like a cooking class but I do ask if anyone wants to try things as we go and if someone offers I find things for them to help with. I arrive 30 minutes ahead and set up and prep as much as I can. Often the host or an early guest will help with the prep. When it's time for the show I start with my story, go around the room and have them sell to each other by talking about their fav products, tell them specials, host rewards, that kind of thing. I find I have their attention most at that time. Then we go cook. During that time I remind them of host and consultant benefits and specials. At the end we play stealing hearts or another "game" and then I do a door prize drawing, then they eat and I take orders. Full service checkout.
 
BethCooks4U said:
Interactive doesn't work for me either. I do my show like a cooking class but I do ask if anyone wants to try things as we go and if someone offers I find things for them to help with.

I arrive 30 minutes ahead and set up and prep as much as I can. Often the host or an early guest will help with the prep. When it's time for the show I start with my story, go around the room and have them sell to each other by talking about their fav products, tell them specials, host rewards, that kind of thing. I find I have their attention most at that time. Then we go cook. During that time I remind them of host and consultant benefits and specials. At the end we play stealing hearts or another "game" and then I do a door prize drawing, then they eat and I take orders. Full service checkout.

This is similar to how I do my shows too!
 
  • #10
I don't really do an "interactive" show like some do. I have a guest read the recipe and keep us inline. I have another guest use the food chopper or whatever else I may be using at the show. I do most of the show myself though.
 
  • #11
wadesgirl said:
This is similar to how I do my shows too!

I do mine as a cooking demo as well....always asking for volunteers to help in different areas....usually NO ONE wants to...but then that's ok. I'm always talking too! About the products...the recipe...answering questions...but then I've taught cooking classes for years.
It just works better where I am and fits my personality as well. And it's how my recruiter and director work :)
I would say to practice different styles and you will find one that fits you better.
 
  • #12
I *love* interactive shows and once that idea came out I haven't looked back. My bookings have doubled. :love: I prep some stuff ( sour cream in Easy Read, measure chips in a prep bowl, etc.) and lay out tools to be used on the cutting board. I have the guests wash their hands, put on a name tag and pick to tool they are interested in or would like to try up off the board. When its time for that tool, its their turn. Works really well.

HTH,
Sandi
 
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  • #13
I think you are all right, I need to watch other consultants in action. I just know of any others. I am in stillwater, mn. . . anyone reading this near me that would be willing to let me observe? Thank you all for your feedback!!
 
  • #14
I'm way up in Roseau County MN....i live in strathcona. I'll check around and see if there is anyone i know a little closer to you......
 
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  • #15
That would be awesome! Thank you.


carlajanes said:
I'm way up in Roseau County MN....i live in strathcona. I'll check around and see if there is anyone i know a little closer to you......
 
  • #16
DianeM said:
I think you are all right, I need to watch other consultants in action. I just know of any others. I am in stillwater, mn. . . anyone reading this near me that would be willing to let me observe? Thank you all for your feedback!!

Use the "find a consultant" feature on the new website to find five near you!
 
  • #17
Yep, I agree with the others...go observe a few other consultants doing their shows so you can get some other ideas. I do it cooking class/demo style, too. Every time I try for an interactive show, it just doesn't feel comfortable and I back out. People just seem so used to sitting down and want to relax, so I don't stir the pot. ;) I do sometimes give out tickets to people who volunteer to try out certain tools and help me, and then do a prize drawing for those people as a thank you.
 
  • #18
babywings76 said:
Yep, I agree with the others...go observe a few other consultants doing their shows so you can get some other ideas.

I do it cooking class/demo style, too. Every time I try for an interactive show, it just doesn't feel comfortable and I back out. People just seem so used to sitting down and want to relax, so I don't stir the pot. ;) I do sometimes give out tickets to people who volunteer to try out certain tools and help me, and then do a prize drawing for those people as a thank you.

I agree with Amanda--the interactive show doesn't work for me. I've tried it a few times and the guests have been not happy about it--"I came to a party, not to cook". So I mostly do the full cooking demo myself. I do offer for anyone to try things as I go along with the demo. I have also learned the art of prepping most everything ahead of time--most of the cutting, etc. Guests don't need to watch me cut every single piece, etc.

Sometimes I do an "express show" where I go about an hour early and help the host make a couple of items, then just talk about it at the show, play a game and take orders. This if for guests who have been to a million PC shows, and just want to come and socialize, eat and order.
 
  • #19
One thing to keep in mind is that there really is no WRONG way to do a show (well, unless you're super rude and put the guests down and tell the host she's stupid=that would be wrong;))
So, watch the training, go to other consultants shows, and find what works for you. If you want to try the interactive, do some research of threads here on how people do them, then commit yourself to a month of interactive shows. Tell the guests you're inplementing a new, fun way to learn about our products and you're going to need everyone's help! Then give it a try for a month and evaluate how you think it went. Decide what went well, what you liked but need to improve, and what you didn't like and eliminate it.

I like trying new things so that my shows aren't always exactly the same. Yes, the core is: intro, my story, specials, product overview, host benefits, demo, guests tell all, biz commercial, stealing hearts, customer care slips, drawing, fsco, eat. But how I go about each may be a bit different since often I'll have "repeat" guests.

You'll find your groove and what works best for you.
 
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  • #20
What is stealing hearts?
 
  • #21
Thanks for everyone who said that interactive shows don't work for them - I thought that I was surely doing something wrong. While I had one show where a guest completely took over - fine by me - most of them do not want to actively participate.
 
  • #22
mlpatch said:
Thanks for everyone who said that interactive shows don't work for them - I thought that I was surely doing something wrong. While I had one show where a guest completely took over - fine by me - most of them do not want to actively participate.

You need to recruit that guest! ;)
 

Related to Expert Tips for Hosting Engaging and Interactive Shows as a New Consultant

1. How do I choose a date and time for my show?

To select a date and time for your Pampered Chef show, simply reach out to your consultant and coordinate a date and time that works best for both parties. Your consultant will also be able to provide you with available options and help you choose the perfect time to host your show.

2. What should I expect during the show?

During your Pampered Chef show, your consultant will demonstrate and showcase various products, share tips and recipes, and provide information on how to use the products effectively. You and your guests will also have the opportunity to ask questions and try out the products.

3. Can I invite friends and family who live far away to join my show?

Yes, you can absolutely invite friends and family who live far away to join your show. With the use of technology, such as video conferencing, your consultant can virtually include them in the show and they can still participate and make purchases.

4. How long does a typical show last?

The length of a Pampered Chef show can vary depending on the type of show and the number of guests. On average, in-home shows typically last around 2 hours, while virtual shows can range from 30 minutes to an hour. Your consultant will be able to provide more specific information based on your show.

5. What are the benefits of hosting a show?

Hosting a Pampered Chef show comes with many benefits, including earning free and discounted products, trying out new recipes, and learning new cooking techniques. It's also a fun way to spend time with friends and family while supporting a small business. You also have the opportunity to earn rewards and exclusive discounts based on the sales from your show.

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