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Do our stones harbor bacteria?

pamperedkel

Member
May 16, 2005
86
0
a customer asked this question and I said no but didn't really have a good explanation to give her
 
Feb 22, 2005
207
0
You can tell your customers that bacteria grows in damp places. Bateria grows when there are food particles stuck to the surface and it has a damp place to grow. The reason that no soap is required is that soap only loosens food particles not kills bacteria and our scrapers serve the same purpose. Scrape them, rinse them and dry them before putting them away and no bacteria will grow.
 

Mystik

Member
Dec 28, 2005
148
0
In one of the Weekly Bites it also suggested using baking soda to clean your stone. Non-toxic and non-soap, works quite well when you sprinkle some on then use the PC scrub brush thingy to scrub it.
 

sOhSherri

Member
Jan 13, 2005
117
0
Bacteria and Stoneware

I just had this question come up from someone thinking or ordering a stone. I found this on WLPCtoo board. This answered her questions and she ordered a stone. I hope this helps.


Removing Bacteria From Stoneware Without Using Soap

By Becky Champlin, Senior Sales Director,
former Clinical Microbiologist


As a former Clinical Microbiologist, I have researched this very completely. Here are the facts as I know them from my research.

1.Soap does NOT sanitize your dishes. It is simply a releasing agent that allows you to remove food particles from your dishes easier.

2.Friction actually does more for removing the bacteria than soap does. This is accomplished by rubbing with a dish cloth or other cleaning tool over your dishes.

3.Hot, clear water is the releasing agent for stoneware. It releases all of the food particles and extra grease from the surface of the stone. Your pan scraper or nylon brush provides the
4.necessary friction.

5.Bacteria needs a warm moist environment to thrive and grow. This is why it is important to do your dishes as soon as possible to discourage the growth of airborne bacteria on your dishes.


6.You will not have bacteria on you stones or your dishes if you cook your food thoroughly. Cooked food does not contain bacteria! However, it will grow bacteria if left out too long after cooking it or by not properly storing it in the refrigerator after you finish your meals.

7.All bacteria known to man is killed at 180 degrees.

8.Because the stones are porous, the moisture does not stay in them; it dries up quickly. If you want to rapidly dry your baking stones, put them in a 200 degree oven for 10 minutes.

9.The seasoning on the baking stones (non-stick surface) is caused by the build-up of small amounts of residual oil from your foods. The dark color of your stones is caused because your stones are made of vitrified clay and the repeated heating and cooling of the stones will darken them.

10.Our stones have been tested and approved for safe food handling and are acceptable for use in commercial kitchens using the cleaning procedure provided by Pampered Chef with your stones.
 

luvbeingachef

Novice Member
Dec 30, 2005
46
0
Thank you for sharing your reply in such a nice outline! It can be easily copied and pasted into a word doc, and would be suitable to provide guests at a Cooking Show. I remember getting an email forwarded to me regarding our Professional Cookware. It was written by a scientist who had changed careers, she was a new mother who had started selling Pampered Chef and was sharing her knowledge on how safe our Professional line of cookware is. She advised that you would get more aluminum ingesting a tums than you would using our Professional Cookware (as directed) in a lifetime of use. It’s nice to be able to share these comments and sources at our shows.
 

pchefinski

Advanced Member
Oct 7, 2005
664
0
luvbeingachef said:
She advised that you would get more aluminum ingesting a tums than you would using our Professional Cookware (as directed) in a lifetime of use.

That is GROSS! :eek: Not that I take Tums (I can't get past the visual of eating a piece of chalk) but reading that just grossed me out hardcore. Ew. Big EW.
 

Swirl

Member
Nov 24, 2005
229
0
Here is a flyer I found on this site. Hope it helps.
 

Attachments

  • t harbor bacteria.doc
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cookingwithlove

Advanced Member
Gold Member
Oct 28, 2004
887
9
dawnsclassycupboard said:
You can tell your customers that bacteria grows in damp places. Bateria grows when there are food particles stuck to the surface and it has a damp place to grow. The reason that no soap is required is that soap only loosens food particles not kills bacteria and our scrapers serve the same purpose. Scrape them, rinse them and dry them before putting them away and no bacteria will grow.

While you are essentially correct, bacteria do need water to live. The reason we do not need to use soap on stoneware is that you are essentially removing anything that will support bacterial grow, ie water and food, with the scraper and then drying the stone before putting it away.

Also think of it this way. If you take a pizza out of the oven it is essentially sterile from the baking. You eat the pizza then clean the pan. Bacteria do not have a lot of time to find the stone and then grow to any significant numbers before you wash it.

If my customers are really concern, I tell them that they can use baking soda to clean their stones.

Best of Everything!
 
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rwesterpchef

Advanced Member
Nov 24, 2004
505
0
Soap - To kill or not to kill?

cookingwithlove said:
While you are essentially correct, bacteria do need water to live. I am a microbiologist (PhD) and soap most certainly does kill bacteria, as well as viruses. Please do not tell people that it does not. This is the reason that is it is essential that you use soap and water to wash your hands. The reason we do not need to use soap on stoneware is that you are essentially removing anything that will support bacterial grow, ie water and food, with the scraper and then drying the stone before putting it away.
...
I find the whole soap does not kill germs thing questionable as well, but didn't question our home office. Why else does a surgeon need to wash hands with soap, restaurant workers,etc. But, check out #12 posting on the following thread and read what home office provided.....hmmmm?:
http://chefsuccess.com/showthread.php?t=5423&page=2&pp=10
 
Feb 2, 2006
1
0
About being porous.....

I do believe what you are saying about stones not retaining moisture since they're porous. But can anyone explain it to me?(basic/laymen terms). When I think porous, I think of something that will soak up water, thus retaining moisture versus non-porous, not accepting or retaining moisture.
I have my degree in music, not microbiology! So, I just need a little help here so I can understand and then explain it adequately to my customers.
Much Thanks!
(But if you ever need someone to explain the form of a Beethoven sonata, I'm your person.....haha)


Congachef1
Independent Consultant for the Pampered Chef
in Texas
 

ChefLoriG

Advanced Member
Gold Member
Mar 13, 2005
545
1
Natural fats and oils from food are absorbed by the stone and create a smooth, non-stick surface. And because bacteria needs food to grow, no food = no bacteria. A well-seasoned stone is easier to clean the food from, than any Pyrex in the Western Hemisphere. Further, ANY surface becomes disinfected when heated to 180°. If I'm not using soap to clean my stone, then how can it be clean? Soap (and detergent) when combined with water molecules penetrates the pores of food residue to soften it. This softening of food residue just makes it easier for the residue to be removed. Hot water alone makes oil and other food substances more fluid and therefore easier to dislodge, especially when used in combination with the nylon pan scraper. This rubbing action will effectively remove food residue.
 
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