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Keeping track of mileage for taxes

n8vtxn

Member
Jul 23, 2005
86
0
I had my taxes done last night and they (h&r block) said I couldn't enter my mileage unless I "declare" my car and ONLY use it for business - but it would also decrease its value. I do have a PC sticker on my back window and to get to shows, but I'm also a mom - which means I use it for picking my daughter up from school, buying groceries, etc. Does this mean I should just not keep track of mileage in the future, or was the lady mistaken? Everyone says to track it, but I'm so confused! :confused:

Leesa
 

jenniferlynne

Veteran Member
Jun 29, 2005
1,998
0
She must be mistaken. When I sold Mary Kay, I had my taxes done by an accountant, and they never told me I could only use my car for business. As a matter of fact, I had two cars and I drove them both to shows. I took an H&R tax class one time. It was a joke. The teacher flew through everything so fast, half of the class was lost. I had thought I might get a part time job there during tax time, but finally just gave up and quit the class.
 

monica_sweetconsultant

Advanced Member
Silver Member
Jul 23, 2005
550
0
i just wanted to say in defense of H&R Block that i was a manager there for a year and a half and we are all very well qualifed. i dont work them anymore but what i learned there taught me enough to do my own taxes each year. Every year they get new software and the person who did your taxes might not of understood the new software or questions. deinately track your mileage. even if they dont give you full deduction you should get some of it. theres a certain form for calculating how much mileage you used your car for peronal and work purposes.
 
Sep 6, 2005
233
0
The person who told you that is not correct. You can deduct some of your mileage. Just be sure to keep track of not only the # of miles you drive to and from each show or other event, but to write down the beginning and ending odometer mileage. I keep one of those small notebooks in my PC bag. When I get in the car, I take it out and write down the beginning mileage. When I get home, I write down the ending and then write the date next to it. An IRS auditor (who used to be my next door neighbor) told my husband to do this because, should you ever be audited, they want the most specific information as possible. It's kind of troublesome, but once you get in the habit of doing it, it's pretty easy and can save you a lot of headaches later on. (Most people on here will think I'm pretty anal for doing this, but I had gotten some tips from this guy before and since he's in the business, I listened)
 

fruit76loop

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Sep 13, 2005
1,159
0
So right!

When you track your mileage you are doing what you are supposed to do! You need to know date, beginning odometer, finishing odometer, and the purpose of the miles. I as well have two vehicles that I use for my business. I use my car most of the time, but I as well have to use our truck sometimes when the Wyoming weather is bad! I have a CPA do my taxes and I get to write off miles from both vehicle!
 

Happy Mom

Member
Aug 11, 2005
177
0
NO! The information for HR is incorrect. It sounds like that person was confusing the following. You need to fill out a separate schedule for business mileage. One of the questions you answer is percentage of use for business; another is percentage of personal use. Your car does not need to be used just for business.

Again, HR employs lots of newly trained people, you need to be aware of the IRS codes and double check your deductions if you think there is an error. When you sign your tax form, you are agreeing that it is accurate.

Please go to the IRS website. You can google it in, and look over the list of deductions available for our job description.

Under "Business", I posted a long list that was forwarded to me from the ex. director of PC. Yhat will give you a starting place.
 

Happy Mom

Member
Aug 11, 2005
177
0
NO! The information for HR is incorrect. It sounds like that person was confusing the following. You need to fill out a separate schedule for business mileage. One of the questions you answer is percentage of use for business; another is percentage of personal use. Your car does not need to be used just for business.

Again, HR employs lots of newly trained people.You need to be aware of the IRS codes and double check your deductions if you think there is an error. When you sign your tax form, you are agreeing that it is accurate.

Please go to the IRS website. You can google it in and look over the list of deductions available for our job description.

Under "Business", I posted a long list that was forwarded to me from the ex. director of PC. That will give you a starting place.
 

bbauman07

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Apr 12, 2005
1,473
2
They are 50% right

Here is a copy of the 2005 tax tips from the PC website. We can claim mileage but there are a bunch of clauses. Mileage to and from a kitchen show is the same as driving to and from work!!!!!! :( I would try to have your taxes relooked at.
 

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Feb 22, 2005
206
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In my personal experience, HRBlock (and chain companies like them) usually offer a guarantee that if you get audited they will stand behind you. That is a great guarantee to have. however, because of this, they usually will only do what they know is not an audit flag. Remember that audit flags are not really always going to get you an audit it just means that your taxes are not the "norm". I have an audit flag almost every year because of deductions that I am more than qualified to take but that most US citizens do not have. I would recomend that you go to a tax preparer that speciliazes in self employment.

Just my 2 cents.
 

DZmom

Veteran Member
Jun 20, 2005
1,063
2
bbauman07 said:
Here is a copy of the 2005 tax tips from the PC website. We can claim mileage but there are a bunch of clauses. Mileage to and from a kitchen show is the same as driving to and from work!!!!!! :( I would try to have your taxes relooked at.


Your mileage IS deductible IF you work from home and have to travel elsewhere to conduct business. It's the same as if you work in an office and you travel from that office to another location to do business.
 

PamperedChef

Novice Member
Silver Member
Jan 1, 2006
27
0
H & R Block

I have had so many people that have their own businesses (Mary Kay, Avon, etc.) tell me that H & R Block is not the place to go with your business taxes, that they don't do very well on these kind of taxes.

Cindy
 

bbauman07

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Apr 12, 2005
1,473
2
DZmom said:
Your mileage IS deductible IF you work from home and have to travel elsewhere to conduct business. It's the same as if you work in an office and you travel from that office to another location to do business.

That is why I said 50% right :) And posted the tax tips. This will be my first tax season with PC. Just going by what the tips say. Thank you for clearing it up though. You worded it a lot clearer then I did. ;)

My husband sold vaccumms last year and H&R did a great job with our taxes, I guess I was lucky.
 

jenniferlynne

Veteran Member
Jun 29, 2005
1,998
0
PamperedChef said:
I have had so many people that have their own businesses (Mary Kay, Avon, etc.) tell me that H & R Block is not the place to go with your business taxes, that they don't do very well on these kind of taxes.

Cindy


When I took that H&R tax class, the teacher went around the room and had everyone tell what they did and why they were there. When I said I sold Mary Kay she started laughing and said that I really needed to take that class because Mary Kay people always mess up there taxes! :eek: The really funny thing is, I had been selling for a few years and was using an accounting firm that was started by a woman that used to work for the IRS!! Almost all the local MK reps used this lady. She had researched the Mary Kay business inside and out, and since she had worked for the IRS, knew what we could and couldn't deduct. Every year they gave us all a worksheet with what we could deduct so we could keep track of everything through the year. We got to deduct everything from supplies, miles, electricity, water, garbage, phone, clothes we wore to the shows, property tax, the square footage that we used in our homes for our office and we even got to deduct the make-up we wore ourself because it was considered advertising. Of course we couldn't deduct any cleansers or moisturizers or that sort of thing because it can't be seen on your face. Only eyeshadow, lipstick etc.....
I still have all my tax papers from then. I will have to look back through them and see if I can find a copy of one of them and post it.
 
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