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Words people mispronounce that drive you nuts...

kdangel518

Advanced Member
Gold Member
Mar 5, 2009
933
1
I have quite a few...

ANT for AUNT (I don't know if this is a regional thing in New England, but I think I'm the only person who actually says AUNT)

My mom can't say Hawthorne (hor-thaw-ne) or orchestra (or-cres-tra) those make me cringe big time!

Mom is big on negatives where there should be positives: i.e. if I said "Wow, I really enjoyed that movie!" she would say "So didn't I." instead of "So did I." didn't means you did NOT enjoy the movie mom! She likes irregardless as well, which is not a word.

MH can't say Swiffer. He says Swifter. Ack!

Axed for Asked is a big one for me. Also we WAS instead of we WERE. There are a lot of things similar to that that people say that just make them sound ignorant... makes me seriously cringe.

My biggest pet peeve for misprounounced words? My name. It's Kara. Sara with a K. Not Car-a, not Kah-ra. Sara with a K people, no different. I'll cut you a break the first few times but after I correct you, no excuses! I still have a few coworkers (I've been here for 4 years!) who still mispronounce it.

And when I'm on the phone people always think I say Karen or Carol. Batty I tell you, drives me batty ;)
 

kdangel518

Advanced Member
Gold Member
Mar 5, 2009
933
1
Oh, and also- this needs washed or this needs fixed.

No... this needs TO BE washed... this needs TO BE fixed. Are we just getting lazy or did we forget proper grammar?
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
I have quite a few...

ANT for AUNT (I don't know if this is a regional thing in New England, but I think I'm the only person who actually says AUNT)

Here in Michigan, that IS the correct pronunciation. If you pronounced it any other way, you would be considered wrong.
 

chefheidi2003

Senior Member
Gold Member
Aug 18, 2007
2,943
2
I have quite a few...

ANT for AUNT (I don't know if this is a regional thing in New England, but I think I'm the only person who actually says AUNT)

My mom can't say Hawthorne (hor-thaw-ne) or orchestra (or-cres-tra) those make me cringe big time!

Mom is big on negatives where there should be positives: i.e. if I said "Wow, I really enjoyed that movie!" she would say "So didn't I." instead of "So did I." didn't means you did NOT enjoy the movie mom! She likes irregardless as well, which is not a word.

MH can't say Swiffer. He says Swifter. Ack!

Axed for Asked is a big one for me. Also we WAS instead of we WERE. There are a lot of things similar to that that people say that just make them sound ignorant... makes me seriously cringe.

My biggest pet peeve for misprounounced words? My name. It's Kara. Sara with a K. Not Car-a, not Kah-ra. Sara with a K people, no different. I'll cut you a break the first few times but after I correct you, no excuses! I still have a few coworkers (I've been here for 4 years!) who still mispronounce it.

And when I'm on the phone people always think I say Karen or Carol. Batty I tell you, drives me batty ;)

I am a big one on names..I have to say that that is one thing that drives me nuts when people mess up..I understand that if it is an unusual one then you might not pronounce it correctly the first time..but really after a while you should say it correctly. That might be because my name is

Heidi - Just like the book - (not HAY DEE)
Kreitzer - (cry t sir) - not Kreiser (cry zer) - not CRYSLER (really where did you see the L)
 

The_Kitchen_Guy

Legend Member
Silver Member
Nov 4, 2005
12,459
79
Kara, it's more likey the pronunciation of "aunt" as "ahnt" is the regional pronunciation and not the other way around. I hear it as "ant" almost everywhere I go. With 249 episodes of the Andy Griffith Show out there with Andy Taylor talking about, and to, "Ant Bee" you're not likely going to change the world.

220px-Cast_01.JPG
 

The_Kitchen_Guy

Legend Member
Silver Member
Nov 4, 2005
12,459
79
Here in Michigan, that IS the correct pronunciation. If you pronounced it any other way, you would be considered wrong.

In Michigan I suspect, like around here, people who say "ahnt" (or "awnt") are looked on as stuffy and pretentious. (Or high fallutin', anyway.)

It's enough to make Kara say, "Uncle."

rimshot.gif
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
In Michigan I suspect, like around here, people who say "ahnt" (or "awnt") are looked on as stuffy and pretentious. (Or high fallutin', anyway.)

It's enough to make Kara say, "Uncle."

rimshot.gif

You suspect correctly. Anyone who says it that way is looked at suspiciously....:D
 

AJPratt

Legend Member
Silver Member
Oct 11, 2005
6,678
4
Kara... OMG names! Don't even get me started! My name is Anne. A-N-N-E. One syllable. People think its pronounced Annie. Its an English, name, people!
 

etteluap70PC

Legacy Member
Gold Member
May 24, 2005
3,665
2
Even though I have been in MN for 11 years I grew up in New England
Here are some that I notice...

it's Soda not Pop
I say Aunt always will...
I hang out the wash not worsh
It will always be a Casserole to me not a "hot dish"

That's a few to start

I know my last name is a pain but when my child's teacher can not even copy it correctly onto their desk label then something is wrong!!!

oh and is pronounced "julfs" not Ju-fus"
 

mrshamel3808

Member
Gold Member
Apr 3, 2009
438
0
So I went to Director Express today and I won't say who was doing it but the facilitator kept saying "exspecially", "alls" (as in "alls you need to do is...") and one other that is slipping my mind now lol
 

The_Kitchen_Guy

Legend Member
Silver Member
Nov 4, 2005
12,459
79
Even though I have been in MN for 11 years I grew up in New England
Here are some that I notice...

it's Soda not Pop
I say Aunt always will...
I hang out the wash not worsh
It will always be a Casserole to me not a "hot dish"

That's a few to start

I know my last name is a pain but when my child's teacher can not even copy it correctly onto their desk label then something is wrong!!!

oh and is pronounced "julfs" not Ju-fus"

It could be worse. They could mispronounce it "Doo-fus."

I find your "worsh" comment an interesting one, because that's a very Boston thing - where the "R" in so many words is left out and added into other ones. (Like "Nohm" Abrahm doing New Yankee Workshop with his Delta table sawr and other such terms.

My grandmother, rest her soul, lived in Upnorth, Wisconsin. She always did the worsh and for some reason, the small port city on the shore of Lake Michigan was always Sheborgan. In doing some Culver family research, I found that her ancestors came out of New England via New York. They brought that bucket full of non-existent "R"s with them and that's who taught her to speak, so she came by it honestly.

I suspect dat's where da Minnesota folk got it from, you betcha.

(Sidebar: If you live in Iowa and are a member of the Culver family, we're probably very distantly related.)
 

etteluap70PC

Legacy Member
Gold Member
May 24, 2005
3,665
2
It could be worse. They could mispronounce it "Doo-fus."

I find your "worsh" comment an interesting one, because that's a very Boston thing - where the "R" in so many words is left out and added into other ones. (Like "Nohm" Abrahm doing New Yankee Workshop with his Delta table sawr and other such terms.

My grandmother, rest her soul, lived in Upnorth, Wisconsin. She always did the worsh and for some reason, the small port city on the shore of Lake Michigan was always Sheborgan. In doing some Culver family research, I found that her ancestors came out of New England via New York. They brought that bucket full of non-existent "R"s with them and that's who taught her to speak, so she came by it honestly.

I suspect dat's where da Minnesota folk got it from, you betcha.

(Sidebar: If you live in Iowa and are a member of the Culver family, we're probably very distantly related.)

I was wondering if anyone would pick up on the worsh thing... My step-mom grew up in CT and was notorious for saying this. I grew up with great grandparents who were English teachers so my mom (then I) learned about proper enunciation early on. I never did have a super heavy accent and now most people think I have almost no accent. Unless I am tired or have tossed back a few anyway :)

Oh and yes I have gotten the "doo-fus" pronunciation.
 

sherri lynn

Member
Sep 17, 2010
465
2
I was a RN for 14 years before I stopped and stayed home with my children. My #1 is "prostrate" for "prostate". You have problems with your prostate. You are prostrate with grief. I never did laugh or anything, it just aggravates me!
 

magentablue

Member
Jul 14, 2010
383
4
Oh, I have some good ones for medical terminology. The most common I hear is Mammiogram. But the funniest, and one that did make me laugh was the lady that claimed (I'm not making this up!) that she had fireballs in her Eucharist. She even said it with such gusto! Somehow, I completely understood that she had fibroids in her uterus.
 

sherri lynn

Member
Sep 17, 2010
465
2
Oh, my gosh!! I started laughing and got choked when I read this magentablue!! You are better than me, because I would not have had a clue what she was talking about, lol.
 

magentablue

Member
Jul 14, 2010
383
4
I had the advantage of knowing what test she was having and why her doctor was ordering it before I spoke to the patient, lol.

Someone mentioned earlier in the thread "Alheimer" disease... in my family it's "Al Heimer's disease." I wondered who Al was as a kid. Now I am married, and my husband's family says the same thing.

And where did Die-a-beet-us come from? No one in my family says that, but ever since that commercial with Wilfred Brimley, I have heard patients saying it.
 

niktim3

Member
Oct 25, 2005
241
0
Truck-late milk....
its so embarrassing for my 38 year old brother inlaw to say when ordering at breakfast... ugh!
 

raebates

Legend Member
Staff member
Dec 6, 2005
18,356
436
The Furry Guy, who is no great speller, had a complaint the other day. He works second shift in a factory. One of the guys who works first shift the same department often leaves the following note on machines, "orld machine." In case you don't speak Hoosier, that would translate as, "oiled machine." Yes, in Indiana oil is often pronounced with an r.
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
Truck-late milk....
its so embarrassing for my 38 year old brother inlaw to say when ordering at breakfast... ugh!

I had to really think about this one.

Is it supposed to be chocolate milk? That was the only thing I could figure out!?
 

magentablue

Member
Jul 14, 2010
383
4
I think I say both "ant" and "awnt." My friend in school used to tease me for saying "ant." I'm going to poke my husband and see what he says.

My dad sometimes slips into "worsh." He also has "an icebox." I talking to MIL about my father's use of the word "icebox" and she said "but he wasn't even alive when there were iceboxes!"

Dad and I are from Fairfield County, Connecticut. I've been told that people from Fairfield County don't have accents. But if you ever heard Cliff Claven from Cheers speak, he sounds a lot like my dad. They grew up in the same town.
 

The_Kitchen_Guy

Legend Member
Silver Member
Nov 4, 2005
12,459
79
Regionalisms are interesting, and it's funny how many of them just hang on forever, like "icebox."

Does anyone in the last three generations really know what a "choo-choo" is? I mean, really know? The last "choo-choo" went out of mainline service in the late 1950s and other than a few in museums and some that are in operation on scenic rail lines, they're all gone to the scrap yard. Even in China, the last place on earth to make steam engines, is switching over to diesel for mainline use.

I do giggle when I see a little kid point to a huge diesel locomotive and say, "Choo-choo!"
 

sherri lynn

Member
Sep 17, 2010
465
2
My gradmother always called a refrigerator a "Frigidaire". I often wondered if that was the brand of the first "icebox" she ever got? Huh, funny to think of that now. My other set of grandparents actually had an icebox, where the ice went to keep the items cold, and they live on an old farm that has an "ice house" where the ice was kept. My one grandma still calls it an "icebox".
 

The_Kitchen_Guy

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Silver Member
Nov 4, 2005
12,459
79
Frigidaire was founded in 1916 specifically to build refrigerators. Billy Durant (founder of General Motors) bought stock in the company and eventually folded it into General Motors. It was such a popular product that it almost became a generic term, like "zipper" did. Your grandmother was not alone in referring to a refrigerator as a "Frigidaire" and, in fact, the term "fridge" is still heard in many homes as a nickname for the icebo...er...refrigerator. (Whether "fridge" is short for "Frigidaire" or just short for "refrigerator" is open to speculation.)

9566af2f.jpg
 

BlueMoon

Advanced Member
Apr 30, 2010
646
0
I use a lot of old expression, like icebox, Frigidaire, silver paper or silver foil (aluminum foil), and when I grew up in Hawaii, it was common to say Choosday (Tuesday), crank up the car--and How now brown cow!! got that from my mom, too.
 
Feb 27, 2012
9
0
My DH is 1 of those 'acrost' people. GRRR! Plus he says 'crick' for creek. He's from PA and he says that's what they all say up North
Actually creek can be pronounced either as "creek" or "crick" . It drove me nuts growing up since we had Duck Creek (sounding like creek) and Baird's Creek (sounding like crick). I finally looked it up in the dictionary and found out both pronounceations were correct.
 
Feb 27, 2012
9
0
Oh, I have some good ones for medical terminology. The most common I hear is Mammiogram. But the funniest, and one that did make me laugh was the lady that claimed (I'm not making this up!) that she had fireballs in her Eucharist. She even said it with such gusto! Somehow, I completely understood that she had fibroids in her uterus.
That's the best!
 

ChefZee

Member
Oct 22, 2011
175
1
Lemme ax you a question. Supposebly this woman wants an expresso, but I told her we only have Jamaican Almond Fudge.

The list goes on and on for me cause I'm an English major with an extreme love for grammar and words (the proper spelling of them to be exact). I used to work at Baskin Robbins and people would ask for Jamaican almond fudge and I would tell them we don't have that flavor, then they'd look and say Jamoca lol. My name gets mispronounced a lot. It's pronounced "Zuh-ned-uh" but most people say Zuh-need-uh.
 

ChefZee

Member
Oct 22, 2011
175
1
OK, now all my most hated mis-pronunciations are coming back to me lol. sang-wich, may-naze, bayg. My last name: Padilla "Puh-dee-ya" common pronunciations "puh-dill-ee-uh" and "puh-dill-uh"

When I lived in Texas, I actually liked some of their pronunciations. Like Ole instead of Oil. Some of my daughters mis-pronunciations that I just adore-linging room (living room) chlockolate, schlepane (airplane) brewked ("brooked" for broken lol)
 
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