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Too much talking, etc........

Jul 20, 2007
207
0
I did a show this past Saturday with a group of ladies who keep booking off each other. They're a great group of women and love to get together and have a "party". This was the 7th show I've done for them. However, they have seen all the products and heard all the speeches so now they've gotten to where they're talking constantly, not listening to anything, walking around doing toasts with mini-glasses, etc. The host was a great host but she had more food than I feel was necessary. My demo was the Creamy One Pot Pasta and a Chocolate Banana Cream Trifle. She had 5 or 6 other appetizers, dips, chips, etc. Some of the guests brought friends so they had not been to one of my shows but I'm feeling like I lose the whole "Pampered Chef Consultant" role because they're all doing other things. I would tell them "ok we'll get started now everyone can see what we have to offer, eat and enjoy the rest of your day". Apparently they were having a major party after I left because they're husbands starting coming in as I was leaving.

I just need to see how to handle this because I have another show with them in March, different host but using the same house as on Saturday. The house I was at on Saturday was amazing and huge and I felt like I was in Kitchen Stadium so I was so excited about doing the show. But I guess they've all heard and seen it so many times they went on with their own things. The new people there were listening but after the alcohol set in with the others and they got loud, nobody could hear what I was seeing. The host did ask them to be quiet at one point but it didn't work.

Anybody ever have this situation? :(
 

CathyP

Member
Gold Member
Jul 2, 2008
61
0
Yes, I have! The worst thing you can do, IMHO, is to try and shout over a rowdy group. What I've done is try and focus on those who ARE paying attention during the demo , but at checkout time I give everyone the same level of service. I still asked everyone if they wanted to host a show and if they wanted more info. on the business opportunity.

To me, the proof of your success at a show is the sales and bookings. My rowdiest show closed at over $750 in sales with three bookings. To be honest, the ones who talked the most, bought the most too! Don't take it personal.
 

BethCooks4U

Legend Member
Gold Member
Jan 21, 2005
13,007
42
Are your shows interactive? With this kind of crowd I would think that would help and try to find new tips or recipes that might interest them. Throw candy or tickets for a prize out to people who help you or share their thoughts on a product. Everyone likes free and it gets their attention. Is there one person who starts it all? Go to her at the beginning and ask for her help so you can get throught the demo part quicker. By all means to all the pre-prep you can and keep it a simple demo for this kind of group.

Start out by pointing out the people who are new to PC/your shows and remind them all that you just want their attention for 45 minutes or so. With a group like this I'd start with the specials and any info that you want to share, then the demo, then the door prize to get them back with you at the end.

If the crowd are ALL people who have been before I would tell them the specials and what you are making and featuring and say that while they might miss some tips you understand that they know and love PC and love to be together to party. Ask who is willing to help you put the recipe together so that we can all eat!

During the demo concentrate on those who ARE engaging in your presentation and make light of those that are, frankly, being rude. "they're just having too much fun" Be sure to keep your sense of humor and don't let their talking make you mad. People who are having fun will remember your PC party as something they would like to do again. They must like you if they keep having you back!
 
Jul 20, 2007
207
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  • Thread starter
  • #4
Thanks for the responses! I did try to make it an interactive show and asked the loudest one of them to help me. The host was busy making drinks and pouring shots so I just let her do her thing. The one who helped me was eager to help but once the shots came out, I lost her. I really couldn't believe they all did a toast with shots right in the middle of the kitchen in the middle of the show. Personally, I thought it was quite rude. I didn't get mad and I joked around with them because they're all really nice women. But sometimes I would really enjoy do an actual show with the demo, advice, tips, etc. I always try to put together different information for my shows but with them, it just goes out the window. Nothing I plan gets done so I just go with the demo, let them eat, drink and order. As of now the show is right at $500. There were probably 15 people there and I'm kinda surprised the sales were more. But she has some outside orders to get this week so hopefully the total will go up.

If anyone else has ideas, please keep sharing. I have at least two more shows with this group and one will be a grilling show outside. Once the alcohol starts, I've lost em'.
 

chefcharity

Advanced Member
Oct 27, 2008
701
0
I have a group like this and these are the two options that have worked for them.
1. Express show....they have seen it all, heard it all and just want to shop, visit and eat. So I have the recipe 90% complete when they get there, put the finishing touches on it, tell them anything new and exciting and let them at it!
2. I make it a competition... 2 recipes, equal number of ingredients, race to the finish line. Great for seasoned hosts/guests.

Like Beth said, don't let them know they are getting to you. It is our job but it is their party....

Good luck!
 

chefann

Legend Member
Gold Member
Nov 4, 2005
22,111
7
This can be a significant issue in the multiple-repeat groups. Unless you change up what you share in your demo, they've seen it. So, either change up the products that you talk about or change your show format.

You can do PC bingo - hand out blank Bingo cards, and have the guests fill in their favorite products, then they cross them out as you mention them during the demo. First person with a Bingo wins free shipping or a door prize.

And it's actually a great time of year to have a repeat group like this. You can talk about only the new products, which they won't have seen, at the show in March.

That said, my personal experience with groups like this is that, unless there's a conscious effort to have them bring new customers with them to the shows, the shows will keep getting rowdier with smaller sales (as everyone starts finishing up their wish lists). It does provide a good opportunity to talk about some of the items that, while interesting and useful, may be ignored in most demos. And the Pantry items make a good show, too. They're nice because customers will need to reorder when they use them up.
 

mom4angela

Member
Jul 30, 2009
160
1
I LOVE the competition idea! I was going to suggest to put tools in everyone's hands and put them to work!!!! I'll remember your idea Charity!!!
 

quiverfull7

Legacy Member
Gold Member
Sep 7, 2006
3,172
0
ChefAnn, do you have that Bingo sheet all made up or do you modify it every time? Can you share that with us if you have it? thanks!
 

Sheila

Legend Member
Gold Member
Mar 26, 2008
5,375
75
I only do the interactive shows, so my repeat crowds always want new recipes to do at each show. They are up & active, so they don't have as much time to snack (and get full) or drink (and get drunk) when they are actually the ones making the food. LOL

I broke out the booking slide yesterday (new to them) and they all hushed to listen. I even handed out a recruit packet to one of the guests.

Then I sat down in the floor with my laptop, told them about a new product & then showed the photo to the group like a teacher would do at the front of a classroom with a book, rotating the laptop so that each guest could see the picture on my laptop. They were all super excited to see what's coming in March & the host specials in April, so I was able to get more bookings out of their group. ;)

Good luck! I think they more you have them participate, the more relaxed you will be at the end of the show. ;)

Then again there's always the theory "If you can't beat them, join them!" Maybe 2 drinks at the beginning of the show is just what you need to get you in the groove to not care! LOL
 

Suzy Englert

Member
Apr 10, 2006
138
0
  • #10
I was so glad to see this post-my last 2 shows have been this way-especially the Friday night show: talking, etc. but some did want to take part in the interactive show and I did focus on them. There were some "newbies" there and of course, they will have no idea about PC because there was just too much talking going on. Sales are close to $600 but no bookings-they would not even be quiet when I brought out the booking slide.
I like the ideas I've read and will keep these in mind for future shows where the guests are talking, etc. I too, remind myself that it is a "party" and that if the guests are having fun and the host had a good time with her guests, that's the most important thing.
Thanks for letting me vent and for these posts, which are making me feel so much better about Friday night's party:)

Suzy in Texas:)
 

chefann

Legend Member
Gold Member
Nov 4, 2005
22,111
7
  • #11
ChefAnn, do you have that Bingo sheet all made up or do you modify it every time? Can you share that with us if you have it? thanks!

I haven't actually done a Bingo show myself, but I was a guest at a Partylight party that the consultant ran similarly (hers was really tic tac toe, but she told is the 9 things to write and then drew cards to call them out in random order). You can create a blank Bingo card very easily in a word processor program. Or, if you want to create cards that are already populated with product names (that match your demo), The Booster has a program that will create them. I've got the program - have been meaning to use it for team meetings - and it's pretty easy to use. The link above has both a disc and a download version available.
 

ChefBeckyD

Legend Member
Gold Member
Sep 20, 2005
20,376
31
  • #12
I've had shows like this...and I've learned that it's the best to just go with the flow, and have fun with it. If they are ignoring you, then just do the recipe quickly, and be available to answer questions and take orders.

I actually had a group like this, where, afterwards, the host and a couple of the guests who were still hanging around thanked me for just having fun, and allowing them to have a fun evening out. They explained that they were all very busy moms, and very rarely got to just hang out, have a glass of wine, and catch up with each other. They had had a previous PC party with a consultant who got upset and "shushed" them all....and the host said that no one ended up buying anything, and they decided that they would never book with her again. They LOVED that I let them just have fun - and I ended up with several bookings, and one of them eventually joined my team...and now she does their crazy wild parties! :thumbup::D
 

DebbieJ

Legend Member
Oct 6, 2005
10,895
2
  • #13
I agree with Becky.
And as far as trying to do an interactive show, you have to plan this with your host during host coaching so she's not off pouring drinks.
 

babywings76

Legend Member
Gold Member
Jun 19, 2008
7,289
59
  • #14
I agree with Becky.
And as far as trying to do an interactive show, you have to plan this with your host during host coaching so she's not off pouring drinks.

Yeah, that just happened to me...except my last host agreed and liked the idea of an interactive show. Not 2 seconds of a guest in the house and she's pouring away. :D
 

Sheila

Legend Member
Gold Member
Mar 26, 2008
5,375
75
  • #15
trink4.gif


You know, I just had a flashback. In my younger days (many moons ago) I can remember the leaders at our girl scout camp crouching down & whispering to the girls who were at the campfire on time & ready to listen & learn.
gossip.gif
The ones who were off to the sides who were being loud & not sitting down would feel like they were missing out on something good and they would hush & come to the circle to see what they were missing! I wonder if that would work at a Pampered Chef show too?
roflmao2.gif
 

BethCooks4U

Legend Member
Gold Member
Jan 21, 2005
13,007
42
  • #16
trink4.gif


You know, I just had a flashback. In my younger days (many moons ago) I can remember the leaders at our girl scout camp crouching down & whispering to the girls who were at the campfire on time & ready to listen & learn.
gossip.gif
The ones who were off to the sides who were being loud & not sitting down would feel like they were missing out on something good and they would hush & come to the circle to see what they were missing! I wonder if that would work at a Pampered Chef show too?
roflmao2.gif

That's good.

Can you ask the host to refrain from serving alcohol until after the demo or 45 minutes into the party (gives her control - "if I'm not done talking by then you go ahead and serve")?
 
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pampered1224

Legacy Member
Silver Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,784
40
  • #17
I have a party on March 6. 90% of these people will be repeats. You know what I am doing - Thanking my host, doing the booking slide, guest bonus, recruiting and that is it! I advertise Pampered Chef Parties not Shows. Most of my hosts hate those shows! When I am done talking, I simply ask for help making our recipes. Those that want to will, those that do not want to won't. I always end up with at least 3 to 4 people helping. I do a lot of prep too. What I do then is listen. I catch all sorts of snippets of conversations. You would be surprised at how much of it is actually about products. The other thing I do, is that when we are making the recipes, I will suddenly, ha ha, get an inspiration, go where everyone is sitting and pitch that product. The last thing I want to hear about later is "that consultant made me work to eat! We sat there for 45 minutes! That wasn't a party or that was no fun!" I have done this for three years now! And it works for me. My show average is a little over $600. So you tell me you must be in control to get sales. I always have bookings too so... Now I just have to beef up my recruiting talk. My last party, I had two ladies tell me how nice it was to see me again. They did not help with the recipes but both placed nice orders, over $60 each and one booked a party for when she gets back from her "snow bird" trip to Florida in June. Her last party was $856!
 

Morgan032032

Member
Nov 5, 2009
64
0
  • #18
I am SO glad I saw this thread! I've been having a really similar issue, except the problem guest is my MOM! Haha. She has been to sooo many of my shows and has sooo many products that she doesn't want to listen anymore. She always sits in the outskirts of the room and chats away..which in turn pulls some of the other guests out of the presentation. I've asked her to keep it down and help me out (in private..not while we're at a show), but then I feel bad because she is so excited to have a night out with her friends (a lot of them booked from her show..which is awesome because it's helping me expand my business!). I always do an interactive show, so it's even harder when they are all paying attention to her.
What I've figured out is that there will usually be at least a few people who WANT to watch the demo and listen to the tips and ideas. I have just been pretty much talking to them and then whenever the rowdy bunch in the back shouts out a question or comment, I include them, too. The guests are there to have a good time and they dont want to be treated like misbehaving school children! I feel like it's best to just let them have a drink and have a good time, and usually you'll see that they are flipping through the catalog while they do it and selling the products TO EACH OTHER.
 

NooraK

Legend Member
Gold Member
Feb 6, 2008
5,871
26
  • #19
I agree that if you're dealing with a repeat crowd, either let them party and have fun, or do something totally different they've never seen before.

Michael Reeves told us that when he's doing his show, if his crowd is getting loud, he just talks more quietly. Not necessarily something that would work with a crowd that's walking around and such, but if the crowd is distracted by catalogs and what not.
 

raebates

Legend Member
Staff member
Dec 6, 2005
18,357
437
  • #20
I'm with those who say let it go or change things up. Even if you change things up, though, it's possible that some of them will just chat. It's a party. If they're having fun they'll think you're fantastic, even if they never hear a word you say.
 

LilChefBeth

Novice Member
Dec 15, 2009
44
0
  • #21
My second party was like this...everyone was talking and drinking and having a good time. I got a little upset at first (I didn't show it) because thats not how a "cooking show is supposed to go" But then I realized that if they were all having a good time, even if they weren't watching me, then who cares? The show itself was about $600 but the host had collected another $400 in outside orders. :D I wish all my shows could be like that. My only advice would be to do an easy recipe, nothing complicated because then you have more time to spend focusing on answering questions, submitting the orders and such.
 

pampered1224

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Silver Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,784
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  • #22
OOO good point. I forgot about that part. I figure that out of 6 parties I am gonna be doing I will be cooking at at least 3 myself. So I have figured out how to do three recipes! Yep, three in about 20 minutes and for around $16. Keeps my hosts happy! I do 1 salad. I love using oil and red wine vinegar with our Greek Rub. Toss romaine with feta cheese crumbles and grape tomatoes. Done before everyone gets there. Then I do a trifle or a 13 minute cobbler. I prep all the ingredients for a trifle before anyone gets there but wait to assemble if I get help so they can help! The cobbler is a dump cake so that takes two minutes to prep and immediately pop in the microwave. I've been doing the chicken fajitas and the pork loin in the DCB so that too is a snap. I prep the veggies and chicken at home! The chicken or pork loin marinates on the way there in Tupperware and it is ready to pop in the microwave when I get there.
 

cathyskitchen

Senior Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2007
2,707
2
  • #23
Then again there's always the theory "If you can't beat them, join them!" Maybe 2 drinks at the beginning of the show is just what you need to get you in the groove to not care! LOL

AHHHHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!! I love it! :D:love::D:love:
 

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