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Pampered Chef: Booths Things I've learned from doing a booth/table

  1. esavvymom

    esavvymom Legend Member Staff Member

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    Ok. So it seems we are getting into a season of Craft and Vendor fairs again. I've learned tons from reading different threads in here, but thought I'd start a thread where maybe we could share a few things we've learned when we've done booths.

    I am finishing up a week-long consignment sale, so I've learned a few things this week:

    (1) Don't overdo the display! Too much product seems to scare people off. Most people didn't even look at what I did have out. A few new products, if you have them, and a few key products from your kit or in my case, I used Kid-Friendly products because it was a kid's sale.

    (2) If you do a drawing, keep it simple.
    I did a Grocery Bag w/2 season's best (Fall/Spring). I offered it to people who seemed more interested in PC or who stopped to look at my booth. I didn't offer it to everyone who walked by. I did offer Recipe cards though to most everyone who walked by. (most people took them)

    (3) Have the prize slips in an open container so you can slip them back OUT and make notes about the person you spoke to....
    (ie.- kids? Products you discussed? Did you hand her certain items- like a recruiting info packet? Did she express interest in certain items or things about PC? etc. )

    (4) This one I learned/realized today- my 'AHA! moment. When you can, try to get the prize drawing slip handed to you directly, and take a look at it! Do it to see what their name is and Thank the person by their first name. I found this allowed me a couple of KEY THINGS: One- I could verify that I could read their name and that I got a phone or email contact, and TWO- I could glance and see if they showed interest in the business opportunity or hosting a show, and could then proceed from there!

    *At my booth this week, I wish I had done #4 sooner. I had 8 recruit leads so far (30% of my entries!) and 12 Hosting leads (almost 50%)!!! Had I been looking at the slips, I could have passed out my recruiting information packets on the spot, and then followed up. Now I have to make phone calls to get them the packets and then the 2nd follow up. Would have been so much better.

    And (5) - this ties with #4- HAVE YOUR 30-second Commercial READY! Know what you will say to a Recruit Lead or a Host lead! I did #4 and saw one lady wanted to host a show and was a "maybe" as a recruit lead...I fumbled on my words something terrible! I did give her a packet for information (recruiting), and said I'd call her this weekend to follow up. But how terrible I must have looked/sounded. So have what you are going to say ready and know it!


    Ok- so anyone else want to share what you have learned from doing booths?
     
    Mar 26, 2009
    #1
  2. BlessedWifeMommy

    BlessedWifeMommy Veteran Member

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    If it is outside, wear sunscrean...

    Okay other things...

    The meat tenderizer works well as a paperweight and draws peoples attention (I think because it is shiny). I had 20 people at my last booth ask what it was.

    Bring Replacement Part order forms.
     
    Deborah Helser and Dora like this.
  3. kaseydee

    kaseydee Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Very good tips & go idea to start the thread!
     
    Mar 26, 2009
    #3
  4. Aunticooks

    Aunticooks Member Gold Member

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    great tips, i have my booth this weekend and am stressing out on how much to take. I think i have almost everything i own but will scale back once i get the booth set up. thank goodness i have 2 hours in the morning to do this. and get packets ready now that i know what you went thru.. thanks much
    traci
     
    Mar 26, 2009
    #4
  5. straitfan

    straitfan Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Okay, I just realized that I don't know the answer to this....can customers just order their OWN replacement parts? I just do it for them!!

    I have a booth on Sat. too (unless the pending blizzard cancels the Fair---8 inches predicted tomorrow!!)
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #5
    Bev Beckett and jbails like this.
  6. Curlyone

    Curlyone Member Gold Member

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    I always keep a copy of the replacement parts list with me so that I can hand it out to the customer. They can fill out the info and send it off with their payment.

    I filled out 2 so far since I became a consultant. The first one, the customer has yet to pay me for and I still have the replacement feet for her a/p/s/c.:thumbdown:

    The other one was sent to me directly instead of to my customer. I had to meet up with her to get it to her. I called HO and they said that they would send me a sticker to return it to HO and then I would have to reorder the replacement part for my customer. Way too much of a pain! :mad:

    So what really happens when others fill out the form? Isn't the item supposed to go to the address listed on the form? I put my consultant number on the form, is that WHY I received the item instead of my customer?
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #6
  7. chefann

    chefann Legend Member Gold Member

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    Yes, customers can order their own replacement parts. They just have to include a card number on the form when they mail it in.

    Some tips I've figured out:

    If you're working an event that is likely to have children attending, fill a QSP with water and some glitter/foil confetti. Kids can play with it while their parents are filling out prize slips/order forms/etc.

    Make sure your info is on every single piece of paper that leaves your hands. That includes recipe cards.

    Mini catalogs are a perfectly acceptable handout. If people insist on getting a full-size catalog (and they haven't placed an order), give them an old one from last season, but make sure it's marked as an old version. I give current catalogs only to people who book a show or place an order. My PWS address is on everything, so everyone else can still see the product line. But 95% of the people who ask for a catalog will not order. So don't waste your current ones.

    If you do have cash and carry items, put price tags on ALL of it. Including individual copies of SBRCs. You can use removable labels (Avery makes them; available at most office supply stores). I use the 30 to a page labels, and use 1/2 label on most items, 1/6 of a label on SBRCs. Using those labels allows you to easily change the prices you have on things, too (if you want to sell them so you don't have to crate them home, for instance).

    Send a follow-up email to your new contacts within 48 hours. It doesn't have to be long, just a thank you for stopping by, welcome to my newsletter, and mention of the current specials.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #7
  8. jenniwest04

    jenniwest04 Member

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    Cash and Carry items...I did an order just for that...I want to make sure I charge tax since I got charged for that but what about the shipping cost? It's only the $4.25 rate but I only ordered the items for cash and carry...how do you all deal with this?
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #8
  9. jenniwest04

    jenniwest04 Member

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    I didn't want to do cash and carry, btw, but it was a requirement for this expo...
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #9
  10. chefann

    chefann Legend Member Gold Member

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    Most of my cash and carry things are stuff that I earned or got free using host credit on "consultant as host" shows. When I sell them C&C, I round the prices up to cover tax, shipping, etc.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #10
  11. PamperedK

    PamperedK Veteran Member Silver Member

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    Fill out the draw slips for the guests. I say this all the time but it makes a HUGE difference in the results I get from the show.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #11
  12. WLMcCoy

    WLMcCoy Advanced Member

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    GREAT TIPS!! Thanks for posting!!
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #12
  13. If you are working a booth with another consultant, be respectful. Don't steal their customer or butt in. Even if the other consultant gives bad info. After the person leaves you can respectfully ask about the info they gave. It even gives them a valid excuse to conact the person after for follow up.Plus if you correct them infront of the customer, you can end up making one of you look like you don't know what you are doing.

    If doing a booth in shifts, don't hang around while it isn't your shift. Unless someone is late to show up after your shift.
     
    Georgeanna McCloskey likes this.
  14. Liquid Sky

    Liquid Sky Advanced Member

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    Do you run across people who get annoyed that you are asking them their information so you can write it down....versus letting them fill in the info?

    I could see the value of filling the info out for several reasons: you can read your own handwriting AND when it comes to the questions about hosting/biz info you can hear and work with their yes's and maybe's.

    Interesting idea!!! Can you let me know the results you have seen since you have started filling out the info? How do you handle it when more than 1 person wants to fill out a prize slip at the same time?
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #14
  15. caraighan

    caraighan Member Gold Member

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    I have a couple of questions about this.

    Do you sit when you've set up a booth at a craft/fair? I find I can't sit!!! I have to keep moving around!!!

    Do you eat at your booth?

    I guess more or less I'm asking for your opinions.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #15
  16. caraighan

    caraighan Member Gold Member

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    Do you actually have time to do that? I find that it gets really busy!!!
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #16
  17. PamperedK

    PamperedK Veteran Member Silver Member

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    Never had anyone get annoyed. I've had people say "oh I can do it" and try to grab the form, but I just say I like to fill them out so I can read my handwriting.

    It's great because you can hear their answer and follow up. For example if they say no to a cooking show, "is that a not now or a not ever"

    If they say yes or maybe "I have a few dates left for April - would you like to pick a date today? No? Is it ok if I call you tomorrow to get you set up?"

    OR if someone says yes to the business, you can set up a coffee time right away.

    I get a lot more solid leads this way. I book tons of shows at these things, and get lots of recruit leads.

    We usually have more than 1 person at a booth. If it's CRAZY busy, we will have draw slips out for those we can't talk to but we prefer to talk to everyone and fill out the draw slip for them.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #17
  18. PamperedK

    PamperedK Veteran Member Silver Member

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    We do not sit at all. Only standing. And no eating. But we also have 2 people at each booth so someone can walk away and have a snack, sit down, etc...

    it might be different if you're by yourself.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #18
  19. jenniwest04

    jenniwest04 Member

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    I think you are good w/ not sitting! At sanctioned college fairs, we are not allowed to go around the tables because it's considered "unfair" that we are making a personal connection w/ the student (weird, I know! And we can't give them any "free" stuff like pencils, etc). BUT a craft show/expo is not sanctioned and you WANT to make that personal connection to the person. I try to stay around the front of the table--not like I'm ready to pounce! Just so that I'm ready to assist with their needs, introduce myself. Like a server, LOL (which I also do as a job!). I have eaten at a booth, but only during REALLY slow times--a girl's gotta eat ;-) My booth tomorrow is 10 - 4 and I have a show at 6:30 that's over an hour drive away! I'm eating. Granted, these are just my opinions, lol, and I always do booths alone since my cluster is about 45 minutes north of me. My mom or sister is always my backup/helper at these things.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #19
  20. caraighan

    caraighan Member Gold Member

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    have you ever done a booth with another consultant and the other consultant is ALWAYS sitting down!

    Last time I felt guilty because I had a lot of leads and she didn't. But, then I was always standing and she was always sitting! I talked to everyone because I was standing. And to beat it all, the chair where she was sitting was at the back of the booth behind the back table!
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #20
  21. PamperedK

    PamperedK Veteran Member Silver Member

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    No I haven't but when I do a booth I take out all the chairs! If she was sitting and you were standing and being proactive, then it's her loss. Sounds like you did a great job.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #21
    Jessica Kidd likes this.
  22. chefann

    chefann Legend Member Gold Member

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    I usually end up using a chair for my paperwork - so I can grab it easily but it's not on the table (too many people will take one of everything on the table whether they're supposed to or not). If there's down time with no customers around, I'll sit for a minute.

    As for food, it depends on the type of event and the crowds. I've worked multi-day events with another consultant - we've each taken a "break" to eat at the food area. But at other multi-day events there hasn't been a separate area, so we end up eating in the booth as discreetly as possible. If it's a short event though, I'll take something that I can neatly snack on during lulls, like protein bars or crackers.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #22
  23. pcchefjane

    pcchefjane Senior Member Gold Member

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    If the person is sitting, that is their own fault if they get no leads! I find that being on my feet the whole time makes me more approachable. I've worked a booth where all the other vendors sat down but me and people tended to just walk by everyone quickly because they felt no one was interested in talking to them. Even if I am restricted to one table and can't do the usual "U-shaped set-up", I am always in front on my booth, handing out the recipe cards!
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #23
    Dora likes this.
  24. etteluap70PC

    etteluap70PC Legacy Member Gold Member

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    I try not to sit but after 6 hrs I get tired. I have a folding stool I like to bring. It is not as obvious that I am sitting.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #24
  25. raebates

    raebates Legend Member Staff Member

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    Ann, you're brilliant.
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #25
    Deborah Helser likes this.
  26. esavvymom

    esavvymom Legend Member Staff Member

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    I think this is a great idea! I wish I had done this more. As I was plugging in the contacts into my P3 and newsletter, I struggled with reading a few.
    But I love what you say to folks as you are filling them out :

    This would have saved me alot of time in follow-up had I known they selected so many "YES" or "MAYBE" boxes on my slips!

    Sitting/Eating/Drinking:
    And I did have a stool (not a chair), and I sat only when it was really slow. Ironically, as the week went on, I was able to stand pretty much the whole time. I would walk around and chat with other vendors now and then when it was slow, versus sitting. Since I was by myselfs, as far as eating, I didn't. I had a bottle of water tucked away. I usually waited until one of the other vendors (there were 4 of us) was around to make sure my stuff didn't walk away, and then I could run to the Food court. I did pack snack bars/grapes- things that were easy to nibble on if I wasn't able to get away.

    Today, I actually had to take my two boys (5 and 8) for the couple of hours this morning. I wouldn't normally do that, but it was a Kids' Sale, so seemed to fit. But they wore their PC AProns and chef's hats (the former Kids line), and they handed out over 100 recipes in 2 hrs! Folks would smile and gladly take the recipe cards and chat with me or them, and say "How CUTE!" I'm not recommending it, but I was able to make it work for me and they had a ball.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2009
    Mar 27, 2009
    #26
  27. Liquid Sky

    Liquid Sky Advanced Member

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    I have also been reading to keep the display simple. Do you think it's best to have 1 - 6' table or 2 - 6' tables as the display?

    I have done several booths where there's been 1 or more tables. I felt with the 1 table it was challenging to fit everything on the table. With 2 tables, it is easier....BUT...then it's really easy to over pack and take tons of products!

    With a very large vendor event...where there's more than 30 other vendors....I am wondering what would make the booth stand out. Does it look "bad" to have a very simple table to try to promote the biz and ours services when other vendors have their tables full of stuff? What is more eye appealing?
     
    Mar 27, 2009
    #27
  28. raebates

    raebates Legend Member Staff Member

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    Actually, I think simple is especially eye-catching when you're at a large event where people have their areas packed. I like to create visual interest by putting a few things on cooling racks.

    As for filling out the forms for people, I often have 3 or 4 people filling out forms at the same time. I can't imagine them waiting for me to finish with the others before moving on to them. I did start having people hand their slips to me instead of stuffing them into a box themselves. That allows me to make a quick note, ask for clarification (not now or not ever?), and make sure they're complete.
     
    Mar 28, 2009
    #28
    kcmckay likes this.
  29. janezapchef

    janezapchef Veteran Member Gold Member

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    The QSP idea works great! I also have used pencil top erasers with water in there, and that REALLY brings them in! (I used them b/c I only had time to stop at Office Max before one booth, and they didn't have glitter. It ended up being awesome! Very good conversation starter and MUCH easier to clean!)

    As for cash and carry... I got this idea at NC a few years ago, and it has worked great. When it is my own booth (meaning not lots of consultants stuff pooled together to set it up, like for a multi-day thing) and all my products in it, this works. If someone asks if they can buy something, I say they can either order it or buy the one on the display. I warn them that the ones on display are used, but they are welcome to check it out and make sure it is only gently used. And, I inform them that the warranty will not be valid on it. Believe it or not, people DO buy quite a bit like this! I've been flat-out shocked! So, when the thing is over and I'm placing my orders from the booth as a catalog show, I just order whatever was sold from my stuff and replace my own. I know it seems crazy, but some people are just cash and carry people and will buy it only if it's available that way, even if it is used! I also typically have mini-serving spatulas, apple wedgers and Season's Bests for people to buy.
     
    Mar 28, 2009
    #29
  30. whiteyteresa

    whiteyteresa Veteran Member

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    I have been working on this idea for a while now - I hope that I can explain it ok

    This is not for a couple of hour’s setup but for a couple of day’s setup

    I have a set of cabinets - about 4ft I think – I would put a piece of counter top on it with a insert into it for a small tabletop burner (so this would look like a stove top – I would be able to display the cookware as if it was on a stove – I might even be able to do a small demonstration if I have electric ) Someone gave me a small sink (one that they call a bar sink) I would then have a half round circle attached to the back of it with a hinge (for easy travel - down for transport and up for display) and on top of this I would put my SA dinnerware. I would also think about taking 2 bar stools with me to set around the table.
    (This cabinet would have industrial wheels on it and a toe kick to hide the wheels for easy moving it.)

    Just some added notes.

    I would place this cabinet in and up front as possible. I would also take a piece of linoleum (8x10 the size of the booth at least that is what my usually is) With the cabinet on top of this it would look like a kitchen. I would still have a 5 – 6ft table with products of it in the back of the booth. I have 2 small tables (1 ½ X 2 ½ ft) one for Recruiting and one for signing up for door prizes.

    I know this sounds like a lot but I have my totes set up in a way that I knew what goes where and so does whoever helps me. My recruiting stuff is in one tote and I labels my totes 1 -2 -3 -4 and that is how they go up on the table. Some totes are very small. I have a tote for my door prize drawing table also.

    I will also pack some things in the cabinet now.

    Before the cabinet thingy – I was able to set up less than 15 minutes – now it might take me about 30 minutes.

    I want my booth to stand out from everyone else’s. So a little extra work for people to say “LOOK AT THAT” I will go a little further

    Please feel free to say that I am crazy for doing this because I have have already heard it many of times

    One added note - I started with this idea because at our home show in my hometown as I walked around, I noticed how other companies (nothing to do with direct sales) was setting theirs booths up - to look like their own business so I thought (I know I shouldn't do that but any way) why shouldn't I do that, to make it look like a kitchen with dining. So that is how the idea got started.

    :chef:
     
    Mar 28, 2009
    #30
  31. scottcooks

    scottcooks Veteran Member Gold Member

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    My best results are when I setup a single table and setup Just The Starter Kit, with some cash & carry items* on the other end.

    I've done the 'make it look like your business' and setup a whole industrial kitchen (the market i do has a rolling steel countertop w/ wire shelves under, I supplied 2 industrial kitchen baker's racks on wheels, but it repeatedly took me 45+ minutes to setup and at least as long to tear down-- nobody bought the stoneware / bakeware / "stuff".

    I'm SO excited about the 2 sauces this season--they are ideal for the crowd that shops this farmer's market.

    *cash & carry items work best when wrapped in a cellophane bag w/ twixit clip on top. If it looks like a "gift", they can either 'be good to themselves' or 'buy it for a friend', and it's ready to give! I put my business card in the bottom, then some Easter grass, then the item, and a twixit that matches the eastergrass on top.

    I do pamper my market guests and myself, by laying a cheapo foam puzzle mat underneath (- Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices) or find one on craigslist, plus I put down a carpet remnant I got for $10 on top of it. LOOKS nice, feels great - and I don't have to worry about it getting gross; it's outside!

    I do have a recipe/contact card liek the following:
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 28, 2009
    Mar 28, 2009
    #31
    Janet Bruce likes this.
  32. pamperedchefqueen

    pamperedchefqueen Novice Member

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    We gave out recipe cards and hershey's kisses, which drew the people in, and old catalogs. We had our info (alternating) on everything we gave out, but I never got ONE call from anyone who saw me at the show. ALL my shows and leads came from either booking a date at the show or me calling them. Follow up is SO important, because 99% of customers do NOT call you, but will be happy to talk to you if you call them. I still think its best to have your info on everything you pass out, but don't expect that to really get you customers. :)
     
  33. PamperedK

    PamperedK Veteran Member Silver Member

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    Good point! I've handed out literally thousands of flyers with my name and info on them at trade shows and I've never had a call...BUT my online sales have increased, so that could be why. Plus, you never know when someone will ask them if they know a PC person and they say "I have a flyer here somewhere that I got from a PC lady" You never know!
     
    Mar 30, 2009
    #33
  34. pamperedchefqueen

    pamperedchefqueen Novice Member

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    I do have a recipe/contact card like the following:
    Attached Files
    File Type: doc PC Booth Handout with Coupons(2).doc (1.01 MB, 37 views)


    Scott, what do you give them if they email you within 48hours, and do you think putting the pamperedchef.com website on there might make them order from home office instead of from your own website? oh and thanks so much for sharing!!! I am TERRIBLE at making my own flyers etc. and am SO GRATEFUL for those who make them up and share. :)

    Mary
     
  35. AlowayFamily

    AlowayFamily Advanced Member Gold Member

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    I have a couple of HWC booths in May. Does anyone have special tips for that? I got some great ideas from this thread and I would love to learn any ideas specific to HWC.

    Thanks!!
     
    Apr 11, 2009
    #35
  36. mscharf

    mscharf Advanced Member

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    that is her loss. I say don't pay the money to do a booth unless you are 1. READY TO WORK and 2. GOING TO MAKE FOLLOW UP CALLS within 48 HOURS!- NO EXCUSES!!
     
    Apr 11, 2009
    #36
  37. esavvymom

    esavvymom Legend Member Staff Member

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    Ok...so I did a few booths in May, and amazingly, learned even MORE things.

    (1) When someone hands me their drawing/contact slip, not only do I glance at their name and see whether they selected anything in recruiting/booking, etc, I ask them "What is the best time to contact you?" and then I make note of it on the slip.

    (2) To try to get folks to book a date at the booth, I had "party in a bag" incentives. It contained the utensils, plates, napkins, an old Season's Best, and the Host Packet- plus a coupon for a Free Cooking Show, and currently a $15 gift certificate (to use at their show). If they say yes on the slip, or when I ask them, then I try to get that date and use the bags to entice them there. So far so good. If I got "Maybe", I did the same thing - "If you are interested, I have a Party in the Bag today. We can pencil in your date today and I'll call to confirm later." I've had decent luck in converting them to 'yes' and on the calendar.
     
    Jun 8, 2009
    #37
  38. whiteyteresa

    whiteyteresa Veteran Member

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    Just thought of this

    You could buy a gift bag that goes with a "Theme Party" Mexican bag for a Mexican party and then have about 3 different mexican recipes cards inside for them to choose 1 recipe, etc.

    That might just get there attention also

    Now what other ideas can we come up with

    :chef:
     
  39. esavvymom

    esavvymom Legend Member Staff Member

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    I saw someone post in another thread that they were using a beach pail.
     
    Jun 8, 2009
    #39
  40. I just joined this group today but I'm super encouraged by the topics discussed. I've been a consultant for 9 months now and still feel so new. Our team has just started doing Saturday Markets/fairs. I like the idea of standing because I understand that it's more... friendly, I guess. What about when the Market is slow? Would you still stand? Also, how do you set-up your booth? We have our table pushed to the back of the wall with product all over it, displayed nicely. On one side, we have our 2 chairs, the other side has a kitchen cart with the drawing , Cash & Carry and Catalogs on it. I like that they come toward you but I'm wondering if that also scares them?? Not many of them REALLY look at the products. Many smile and walk on or if I say : "Would you like to enter our drawing??" , some look at you like your scamming them. So maybe I need to change the way I approach them?? Help me out please! :)
     
    Jun 11, 2009
    #40
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