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Pampered Chef: Sales On average HOW many guests do you have?

  1. nancycookspc

    nancycookspc Member Gold Member

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    At your cooking shows.

    I have moved over 1yr ago from NJ to VA

    NJ very congested and populated, VA where I am is not that populated unless I go towards DC area.

    Since moving I have had a hard time getting a good attendance. I do HOST coach. I'd say I normally I have about 5-8 guests....that stinks!
    In NJ I would seem to always have 10-15+ guests.

    Could it be the economy? Could it be I was spoiled in NJ with being so populated and things and people live closer together? Maybe I am not coaching right(don;t think so, I ve earned TPC in sales 5 yrs in a row in NJ)

    I really do not want to resort to mailing out invites unless I have too.

    Any input??

    Nancy
     
    May 4, 2009
    #1
  2. ChefBeckyD

    ChefBeckyD Legend Member Gold Member

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    Sorry Nancy - the best advice I can give is to mail out invites, and to use the mini catalog.

    When my hosts do their own inviting, I have about 5-8 people. When I do the inviting, I have 10-14 or more....

    Every Time! I browsed through my shows just since Jan...and without fail, this is what happens.
     
    May 4, 2009
    #2
  3. My hosts invite a good number of guests but never follow up to see if they are coming. Does doing the inviting yourself help this? I'm not even sure I'm convinced that post cards are really the best way to invite or generate excitement anyway. Becky, what is your process for inviting and how do you incorporate the mini catalogs?
     
  4. DebbieJ

    DebbieJ Legend Member

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    Yes, sending out the invites usually does make a big difference. I also tell my hosts that it's more comfortable to have more guests given the economy--if someone can't order, it's less noticeable when there are more people there.

    I also stress with my hosts that their #1 responsibility is to INVITE everyone and REMIND them to come. I coach them to make phone calls to everyone first and then when we mail something it's a reminder, not the initial invitation.
     
    May 4, 2009
    #4
  5. ChefBeckyD

    ChefBeckyD Legend Member Gold Member

    20,466
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    I use the postcards - but only for the show info. I mail them in an envelope, and include the mini catalog with it. I print up labels w/ the show info on them and put that on the postcard, and then in the address area, I put other info - a stamp from Vista, that says "bring a friend and receive a free gift" and labels I've made that say (depending on the type of show) "The Incredible 30 Minute Chicken - You MUST see it to believe it!" or "Don't Miss The Excitement! Real Food in Under 30 Minutes!" etc.....
    Then, on the Mini, I put a label that explains how to place their order online if they can't make the show....
    All of this goes in an envelope, and I hand-address those, to make it personal. I think if you label it, it looks like bulk mail - and everyone like to get personal mail!
     
    May 4, 2009
    #5
  6. That's nicely done Becky, I can see how that would be much more compelling than the postcard alone. Thanks for the insight, I will begin incorporating that right away :)
     
  7. nancycookspc

    nancycookspc Member Gold Member

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    Becky-
    Whose return address do you use...your or the hosts?
     
    May 4, 2009
    #7
  8. ChefBeckyD

    ChefBeckyD Legend Member Gold Member

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    I use mine - a stamp...but then after my name, I write in the host's name too - so it's says Becky D & Suzie Host. :)
     
    May 4, 2009
    #8
  9. chefjeanine

    chefjeanine Legacy Member Gold Member

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    I use the host's return address. This gives him or her the opportunity to follow-up on those invitations that don't make it to the addressee.

    I make my own tri-fold invitations. I have a generic one, one for the 30-minute chicken show and can easily create new ones for any occasion. The inside stays in the same format (I would post here but I make on Publisher). It has the host's name, time & location of party, RSVP # (and a deadline to RSVP), the guest specials for the month and -- most important of all -- how to order online on the show.
     
    May 4, 2009
    #9
  10. Crystal Patton

    Crystal Patton Advanced Member

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    I also print out a full page invite. I attached my master copy.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. chefsteph07

    chefsteph07 Legacy Member

    3,248
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    I usually get anywhere from 8-20 guests! I know, not very consistent, but the sales have been great lately...
     
    May 4, 2009
    #11
  12. chefjeanine

    chefjeanine Legacy Member Gold Member

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    I'm going to attempt to attach a pdf of my invitation.

    View attachment invitation example.pdf

    If this works, you'll see that I don't use an envelope to mail my invites. I print out labels, fold and secure with a little piece of tape. Works great for me.

    As Becky already said, sending the invitations (and I make the reminder calls, too) is the key to increasing show attendance.
     
    May 4, 2009
    #12
  13. beepampered

    beepampered Veteran Member

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    Nancy: I've been thinking about this a bit and these are my personal observations....

    1. There is a difference in the rural v. urban crowd. The rural crowd spends less and is much more practical. Your rural hosts might be as well so promoting the practical part of hostessing might help.
    2. There is a difference in the Northern v. Southern crowd. I live outside Raleigh, NC where I have several times been the ONLY person at a party originally from the South. There are a ton of transplants here. This is a vast generalization....Northerners seem to be much more brazen in their approach. "I'll just tell my girl friends they owe me..." or WAY more liberal with the wine and whatnot.
    3. Southerners might need to be encouraged to invite more people since they might be more "polite" in their approach. My very southerner neighbor spends WEEKS making her guests list where I could see a northerner simply sending an email to everyone in her address book.
    4. Your host coaching might need to be more gentle but firm if your an urban northerner working with a rural southerner. "You don't want to offend your neighbor by not inviting her. Even if you don't see her often she might wonder why all those cars are in front of your house and feel left out." or "Even though Sally's husband lost her job, she might still want to socialize with her friends. I promise I won't pressure her to buy anything."

    Good luck....
     
    May 6, 2009
    #13
  14. Nancy where in VA are you? There are huge differences in the state. As mentioned in another thread about how far I travel, I do extremely well in the more rural part of the state and am struggling outside of my own front door. Let me know where you are in VA
     
  15. nancycookspc

    nancycookspc Member Gold Member

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    WOW Bee....I think you have hit the nail on the head!
    My 1st 6 yrs were in NJ..where I grew up and YES we do tell our potential guests you owe me...you better come over...etc

    Hmm...I guess I will have to adapt my way of thinking !

    Thanks!
     
  16. nancycookspc

    nancycookspc Member Gold Member

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    hey on sencond thought are you calling us northerners or implants RudE?:rolleyes:

    only joking. he he
     
  17. beepampered

    beepampered Veteran Member

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    No, the northerners are not rude to each other but to a southerner it might be considered rude. I think that southerners might require a bit more nudging to get a full guest list. However my NY host the other night only invited 20 people but said it was everyone she knew.
     
    May 9, 2009
    #17
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