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Pampered Chef: November 10, 1975 - The Last Voyage of the Edmund Fitzgerald

  1. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    In 1976, Gordon Lightfoot released a ballad called The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald. Although considerably longer than most radio stations liked to play on the air, it quickly went to #2 on the Billboard Chart.

    The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
    of the big lake they called "Gitche Gumee."
    The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
    when the skies of November turn gloomy.
    With a load of iron ore twenty-six thousand tons more
    than the Edmund Fitzgerald weighed empty,
    that good ship and crew was a bone to be chewed
    when the "Gales of November" came early.


    For a long time, many of us had no idea that the ballad was a true story. It was November 10, 1975 that one of the most memorable marine disasters of the Great Lakes occurred on Lake Superior. It is said that Lightfoot was so incensed at a newspaper report of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald with the name misspelled that he sat down and wrote the song.

    The tempermental weather of November is well known and has claimed mariners' lives of the Great Lakes for decades. There is a record of a ship loaded with furs, belonging to the explorer, LaSalle, that sank in "Gitchee Gumee" in the Fall of 1680. Gitchee Gumee is Objibwa and means "big water."

    The SS Edmund Fitzgerald was built by the Great Lakes Engineering Works in River Rouge, Michigan and launched in 1958. Owned by the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, she was named for the Chairman of the Board of the insurance giant. (The board took the action while Mr. Fitzgerald was out of the room, knowing that he never would have allowed the action to be taken!) Mrs. Fitzgerald christened the 729 foot ore carrier in 1958.

    The ship was the pride of the American side
    coming back from some mill in Wisconsin.
    As the big freighters go, it was bigger than most
    with a crew and good captain well seasoned,
    concluding some terms with a couple of steel firms
    when they left fully loaded for Cleveland.
    And later that night when the ship's bell rang,
    could it be the north wind they'd been feelin'?


    The Fitz was a bulk freighter primarily built to haul taconite, a low-grade iron ore. At 13,629 tons empty, 728 feet long and 75 feet in width, she was largest on the Great Lakes at the time of her launch.

    On November 9, 1975, at 2:15 PM, the "Fitz" left the ore docks in Superior, Wisconsin with a load of taconite pellets. The load weighed 26,116 tons, almost twice the empty weight of the ship, although the Fitzgerald was designed to hold up to 30,000 tons. The cargo was bound for Detroit, to become Ford automobiles, then the Fitz would move on to Cleveland to pick up another load.

    Shortly after departure, the Us Weather Service issued gale warnings for the area of Lake Superior where the Fitz was headed. About 15 miles behind the Fitz, the SS Arthur M. Anderson was on the same heading, destined for Gary, Indiana. The captains decided to take the northern route, along the shore of on the Canadian side of Superior, to be in the lee side of the storm.

    The Great Lakes had been higher than usual since 1969 and the US Coast Guard allowed owners to load deeper, so their ships would ride lower in the water. The Fitzgerald was loaded this way, moving the decks three feet closer to the surface than usual.

    The wind in the wires made a tattle-tale sound
    and a wave broke over the railing.
    And ev'ry man knew, as the captain did too
    'twas the witch of November come stealin'.
    The dawn came late and the breakfast had to wait
    when the Gales of November came slashin'.
    When afternoon came it was freezin' rain
    in the face of a hurricane west wind.


    Just after midnight on November 10, the Fitz reported winds up to 52 knots with ten foot seas. After sunrise, the Fitz reported winds of 35 knots with ten foot seas. It would be the last weather report from the Fitzgerald. At 7:00 AM, the storm front came through Marquette, Michigan and headed out to sea.

    That afternoon, the Anderson reported winds of 35 knots. The wind shifted from the northeast to the northwest. The two ships were no longer protected by the Canadian shore and were now fully exposed to the rath of the winds. The Fitzgerald radioed the Anderson and reported that high seas had done some damage to the deck, the ship was listing to port and that two of three ballast pumps were running. About a half an hour later, the Fitzgerald asked the Anderson for navigation assistance because both of the ship's two radar systems had failed.

    The Whitefish Point radio beacon and lighthouse went dark during the storm. The Fitzgerald radioed the Coast Guard to inquire about the status of Whitefish Point, but the confirmation came from the salt water vessel, Avafors, that the lighthouse was dark and the beacon was not operational. The Fitzgerald reported to the Avafors that both radars were out and waves were crashing over the deck.

    (Continued Next Post)
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  2. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Part 2

    When suppertime came the old cook came on deck sayin'.
    "Fellas, it's too rough t'feed ya."
    At seven P.M. a main hatchway caved in; he said,
    "Fellas, it's bin good t'know ya!"
    The captain wired in he had water comin' in
    and the good ship and crew was in peril.
    And later that night when 'is lights went outta sight
    came the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.


    Sometime around 7:00 PM, the Anderson was struck by two giant waves that put water over the top of the ship, more than 35 feet above the water line! The waves damaged the starboard lifeboat.

    At 7:10, the last message was broadcast from the Fitzgerald, "We're holding our own."About quarter after 7, the Fitzgerald entered a squall and was obscured on radar. By 7:30, the Fitzgerald disappeared from the Anderson's radar altogether.

    Does any one know where the love of God goes
    when the waves turn the minutes to hours?
    The searchers all say they'd have made Whitefish Bay
    if they'd put fifteen more miles behind 'er.
    They might have split up or they might have capsized;
    they may have broke deep and took water.
    And all that remains is the faces and the names
    of the wives and the sons and the daughters.


    Pieces of the wreck were found almost immediately after the weather settled down. A US Navy plane with special radar, used to hunt submarines, located the wreck on November 14, but the wreckage was not officially identified as the Fitzgerald until May of 1976. The ship is broken into two parts with a relatively small debris field. There is a stunning model of the debris field in the Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. The SS Edmund Fitzgerald lies beneath 530 feet of ice cold Lake Superior.

    [​IMG]

    Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings
    in the rooms of her ice-water mansion.
    Old Michigan steams like a young man's dreams;
    the islands and bays are for sportsmen.
    And farther below Lake Ontario
    takes in what Lake Erie can send her,
    And the iron boats go as the mariners all know
    with the Gales of November remembered.


    Lake Superior is the largest, and coldest, of the Great Lakes. The water is so cold that bacteria, that usually helps degrade bodies, cannot live in the cold water. With most shipwrecks, decaying bodies become gaseous and rise to the surface. Not so in Superior. The cold water prevents the growth of bacteria and, with no bacteria, the bodies sink to the bottom and remain there. Gordon Lightfoot refers to this phenomenon in both the first and last stanzas of his famous song.

    While not the worst of the over 6,000 sinkings in the Great Lakes, the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald is still one of the most mysterious and talked about of them all. There are several theories of what caused the wreck, but with no witnesses, one theory is as believable as another.

    One of the commonly accepted theories initially was that two waves lifted the Fitz at the bow and the stern. The heavily loaded midships was unsupported, and subsequently broke and sank. Another theory says a rogue wave pushed the bow below the surface and the ship sped to the bottom, driven at 15 knots by its own engines, breaking up when it struck.

    The US Coast Guard presented a theory, dismissed by most Fitzgerald buffs, that says a wave swamped the deck and improperly clamped hatches took water. The lake carriers association believes the ship struck a shoal and the subsequent damage caused the doomed ship to take on water from below. No one knows, except that the ship went down very quickly. Contrary to the Lightfoot lyrics, it is assumed that the crew had no idea of their imminent doom.

    For many years, mariners have spoken of a phenomenon called "rogue waves." The concept of rogue waves was dismissed as legend until 1995, when rogue waves were first measured at the Draupner oil platform in the North Sea. Rogue waves are thought, by some, to be oceanic only, however, with the size and depth of Lake Superior, they might be possible on this inland ocean. The Anderson reported two giant waves about 10 minutes before the Fitzgerald disappeared, about 10 miles ahead of the Anderson.

    Sadly, the Fitzgerald lies about 17 miles west of Whitefish Bay, which would have provided safe haven for the doomed ship.

    In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed,
    in the "Maritime Sailors' Cathedral."
    The church bell chimed 'til it rang twenty-nine times
    for each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald.
    The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
    of the big lake they call "Gitche Gumee."
    "Superior," they said, "never gives up her dead
    when the gales of November come early!"


    The next morning, in the Mariners' Church in Detroit, the bell chimed 29 times for each sailor aboard the Fitzgerald.

    Several dives have been made to the wreck. The bell is the only item that has been salvaged, and it was salvaged at the request of the families of the crew. It was restored and is on display at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum in Michigan, at Whitefish Point. The bell rings 29 times on November 10 each year, in honor of the 29 souls that perished that fateful night in 1975.

    During the last dive, the bell was replaced with a plaque that bears the names of the 29 crew members of the last voyage of the Edmund Fitzgerald. It was the last legal dive made to the ship - the wreck is closed to everyone and remains a monument to Great Lakes mariners.

    Gordon Lightfoot's immortal The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald was released in 1976. He still sings the song in concert to honor the 29 souls who perished on that fateful night.

    Lyrics Copyright Gordon Lightfoot, 1976

    Links of Interest

    Gordon Lightfoot: Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald - Song Lyrics

    The Edmund Fitzgerald Online

    The Sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald

    The Fateful Voyage of the Edmund Fitzgerald - The Detroit News
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
  3. legacypc46

    legacypc46 Senior Member Gold Member

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    This was a wonderful post KG. It's a little 'morbid' to say this is one of my favorite ballads, but I always stop whatever I'm doing when this song comes on the radio (I obviously listen to 'oldies') and just listen.

    leggy
     
    Nov 10, 2007
    #3
    mspibb likes this.
  4. pamperedlinda

    pamperedlinda Legend Member Gold Member

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    Thanks for the history lesson KG. I love Gordon Lightfoot's music.
     
    Nov 10, 2007
    #4
  5. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Lightfoot's haunting melody is probably what made the sinking of the Fitz as, well, popular as it is. The more I read about the Fitz, the more interesting the story becomes.
     
  6. itsjustCarla

    itsjustCarla Advanced Member

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    I love this song and could sing the words and hear the music as I was reading your post. Being from Indiana, we hear this song on the radio on that anniversary day as well.

    Thank you....what a beautiful post.
     
    Nov 10, 2007
    #6
  7. janetupnorth

    janetupnorth Legend Member Gold Member

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    Thanks for the reminder KG!!!!!

    My DH loves history, especially maritime history and taught me about this one a few years back - it is a fascinating story...and very sad for the families.

    I think the history channel has done a story on it too...either that or I just read a lot to get the story.

    I'm going to remind DH today is the anniversary of it.

    On the Great Lakes, they are fascinating bodies of water. My DH sailed on them from Racine to Door County many times (racing sailboats). Storms can practically pop out of nowhere and are VERY frightening to say the least. Many people feel much safer on the ocean than on the Great Lakes. ...and they are DEEP! ...and the waves you mentioned are scary! My Dad used to go out on Lake Michigan a lot, and he'd talk about the waves that would suddenly appear out of nowhere and be very high.

    Fascinating stuff...thanks again for the rememberance!
     
    Nov 10, 2007
    #7
  8. pkd09

    pkd09 Future Director Silver Member

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    A couple years ago my husband and I stayed overnight at Whitefish Point. There is a B&B, of sorts, there on the grounds. It is the converted crews quarters (very nice). The Museum is on the grounds and it is totally awesome. The lighthouse still works so we got up about 2 a.m. and walked the beach. The stars lit the night. We truly enjoyed our visit. I live in NW Ohio and some of the crew on the Fitz were from our area. It is very close to home and always close to our hearts. Thank you for remembering.
     
    Nov 10, 2007
    #8
  9. pampchefrhondab

    pampchefrhondab Senior Member

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    I've been to the museum as well and saw the bell. What an awesome place to visit, but so somber and sad when you read about all the ships that have wrecked there and all the lives that were lost.

    If anyone lives w/in driving area of Whitefish Point I highly recommend going there.
     
  10. lkprescott

    lkprescott Veteran Member Silver Member

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    Growing up, this was one of my favorite songs as a kid... I loved the haunting melody and I always figured it to be true... not sure why, just made sense to me. I absolutely love Gord's music... such a wonderful voice.
     
    Nov 11, 2007
    #10
  11. caynreth

    caynreth Member

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    Made a mention of this to my hostess yesterday, who is someone I have been singing with for several years. She was upset that she had forgotten it, so at her show, after the demo and everyone was eating and chatting, she and I performed the ballad for everyone. And then later at home, my husband sang part of it for the kids explaining about the wreck. As unschoolers, we get those science and history lessons in any way we can!
     
    Nov 11, 2007
    #11
  12. PamperedChefDebi

    PamperedChefDebi Veteran Member Silver Member

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    Wow KG, that was fantastic. I remember as a kid hearing that song on the radio and loving it. I still remember the words too. I also knew it as being true. Of course, being from Ohio, it may have been more likely that I heard more about it. Thanks for the memories.
     
  13. raebates

    raebates Legend Member Staff Member

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    Thanks for the history, KG. I've always loved the song. The haunting melody sticks with me. The fact that it's a ballad that honors a true, historical event is a bonus. You gave me some interesting details.
     
    Nov 11, 2007
    #13
  14. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Thank you, all, Great Lakes shipping is something of some interest to me, although I've never gotten into it as deeply (so to speak) as some historians have.

    My great-grandfather died at sea on Lake Michigan, although no one seems to know from what. It wasn't as romantic as going down with his ship, in fact, someone told me he died of influenza but no one in the family really knows for sure.

    I've crossed Lake Michigan numerous times on the Pere Marquette/C&O carferries - now the SS Badger is the last one left. Next Summer, I plan to try the new, high speed, Lake Express ferry.

    Just remember that Gichee Gumee never gives up her dead.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2008
  15. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    It is one year later, November 10, and the anniverary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

    This bump is in honor of the 29 souls that went down with The Fitz, and to honor all who have perished on the Great Lakes.

    You too, Grandpa Newberry!
     
  16. chefsteph07

    chefsteph07 Legacy Member

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    I love this song...

    In high school we studied this song and the history of what happened...so tragic...
     
    Nov 10, 2008
    #16
  17. Bren706

    Bren706 Senior Member Gold Member

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    Thanks for bumping this KG! I missed it last year. This is one of my DH's favorite songs. He loves Gordon Lightfoot. I will have to let him read this later.
     
    Nov 10, 2008
    #17
  18. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    It is now two years after this thread was originally posted, November 10, and the anniversary of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald.

    This annual bump is in honor of the 29 souls that went down with The Fitz, and to honor all who have perished on the Great Lakes.

    You too, Grandpa Newberry!
     
  19. pampchefrhondab

    pampchefrhondab Senior Member

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    Wow, has it been a year since you posted this last!! Where does the time go!!

    I do love this song - such a sad story! I know I posted last year, I've been to the museum up there in Michigan where the bell from the ship is. Amazing how many ships were lost in that same area.
     
  20. baychef

    baychef Senior Member Silver Member

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    I had mentioned on yesterday's post for Paige that the captain was from a small city of Ogdensburg about 35 miles north of where I live. Then I went to the official site of the E.F. and found out that the captain, McSorley was from Ohio!!! Hmmm...the name is common for the city of Ogdensburg so I googled his name and came up with this information:

    Captain of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Born in Canada, Ernest Michael McSorley moved to the United States in 1924 with his family when he was a child and was raised in Ogdensburg, New York. With his home near the St. Lawrence Seaway, he had been around boating and ships his entire life.

    He was about 13 years older than my Mom who grew up in Ogdensburg and I was also born in Ogdensburg which lies on the St. Lawrence River. I seem to remember that when this voyage was completed, he was going to be going home for Christmas. However, the seaway closes in early to mid December so the entire crew may have been ready to break until the seaway opens in early spring.

    The St. Lawrence River used to be very rough rapids and impossible for navigation. It connects vital ship navigation from Montreal, Canada to Lake Ontario connecting into the Great Lakes system. The river was heavily dredged 50 years ago this year. It is now several hundred feet deep and wide so that ships may safely pass through the channel. Building of the seaway employed many US and Canadian people and lives were lost in the making.

    These lake and ocean going vessels continue to fasinate me today just as they did when I was a child. I think views of the ships and river views are best captured in Micheal Ringer's artwork.

    Watching these ships float down the river all lit up at night when the water is like glass is simply breath taking. Sometimes in December some of the crews will either string Christmas lights from one or several masts to create the look of Christmas trees that can be seen from miles away.

    Can you get a sense of why the call those of us "hooked" by the beauty of the river..."River Rats"???? (I do love cheese too...we have River Rat Cheese Co.!!)

    PS...KG, thanks for bringing this post up. I missed the original one and learned so much more!
     
    Nov 10, 2009
    #20
  21. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    It is now three years after this thread was originally posted, November 10, and it's the 35th Anniversary of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald.

    This annual bump is by popular demand, but mostly in honor of the 29 souls that went down with The Fitz. I also want to honor all who have perished on the Great Lakes.

    You too, Grandpa Newberry!
     
  22. cochef

    cochef Veteran Member Gold Member

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    I just saw this post and didn't realize the whoe story behind the song. Thanks so much for re-posting it! We are seeing Gordon Lightfoot in concert this weekend so I am really looking forward to hearing him sing it :)
     
    Nov 9, 2010
    #22
  23. lt1jane

    lt1jane Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Thanks for the bump. The weather man reminded us of this anniversary last night on TV. It's especially fitting this year as we had such strong winds a few weeks ago we actually had winds 50-60 mph with gusts much higher. I'm in Appleton, WI with lots of land around. The east side of Lake Winnebago was recording the highest winds and gusts. The wind absolutely whips over the water.

    I too, love that song and remember it playing on the radio the first time...
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2010
    Nov 10, 2010
    #23
  24. raebates

    raebates Legend Member Staff Member

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    I's eerie and sad, but I think it's important to remember. Thanks, KG.
     
    Nov 10, 2010
    #24
  25. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Jane, Lake Winnebago scares the bejeebers out of me. I hate being on big, shallow lakes when a storm come up and I hate how the waves chop instead of roll. I cannot imagine what Winnebago was like during those windstorms last week.
     
  26. lt1jane

    lt1jane Veteran Member Gold Member

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    It's actually a pretty good lake when it's not windy. I think more people are scared of the Butte des Morts bridge on Highway 41 going over it. It doesn't bother me, in weather I take a little more caution just because I don't want to get in an accident and end up in the drink. The bridge is actually fairly low to the earth and is a straight shot over the water making it fairly easy to travel on a daily basis.
     
    Nov 10, 2010
    #26
  27. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    The Butte des Morts causeway doesn't cause me any anxiety anymore. It did cause some when I was a kid because in those days, the causeway only carried two lanes. There was a bascule bridge in the middle of it, and when that sucker went up, traffic backed up for miles. I hated being stopped in the middle of the causeway. (Butte des Mortes is only about 9 feet deep.)
     
  28. ChefBeckyD

    ChefBeckyD Legend Member Gold Member

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    My 6 year old is completely fascinated with the story of the Edmund Fitzgerald...or as he says - "Those of us who are really 'intrested' just call it The Fitz, Mom".

    He saved up his Birthday and allowance money so that while we were camping in the U.P. this summer he could go to Whitefish Point to the Shipwreck Museum, and get an authentic model of ship. He also was able to stand next to the bell of the ship to have his picture taken. He treasures the model and the ship, and took them to school for Show n Share the first week of school this Fall. He came home thoroughly disgusted because none of his first grade classmates knew anything about the Edmund Fitzgerald.

    It is a haunting and sad story. Our whole family is quite taken by it. (although none so much as our little guy!)
     
    Nov 10, 2010
    #28
  29. raebates

    raebates Legend Member Staff Member

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    That is one special little guy. I especially like, "Those of us who are really 'intrested' just call it The Fitz, Mom."
     
    Nov 11, 2010
    #29
  30. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    It is now four years after this thread was originally posted, November 10, and it's the 36th Anniversary of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald.

    This annual bump is by popular demand, but mostly in honor of the 29 souls that went down with The Fitz. I also want to honor all who have perished on the Great Lakes.

    You too, Grandpa Newberry!
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  31. raebates

    raebates Legend Member Staff Member

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    It's a somber remembrance. I cannot imagine the fear of the men on board or the hurt of those they left behind.
     
    Nov 10, 2011
    #31
  32. lt1jane

    lt1jane Veteran Member Gold Member

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    one of my co-workers was born in Superior, WI. She and her father have always had a soft spot for the Edmund Fitzgerald. She always re-reads the book at this time of the year. I'm looking forward to borrowing it from her when she's done.

    My interest was sparked by studying the song in 8th grade. I was familiar with the song, but didin't realize the historical significance behind it. I was 5 when it sank and 6 when the song hit the radio. I have always liked the song. Funny, it took a Canadian to write and perform an epic song about an American shipwreck.
     
    Nov 10, 2011
    #32
  33. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    It is now five years after this thread was originally posted, November 10, and it's the 37th Anniversary of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald.

    This annual bump is by popular demand, but mostly in honor of the 29 souls that went down with The Fitz. I also want to honor all who have perished on the Great Lakes.

    You too, Grandpa Newberry!

    ETA: In 2010, as a result of information revealed by dives to the ship, Lightfoot changed one line of the song.

    The line was:

    "At 7 p.m., a main hatchway caved in, he said,
    'Fellas, it's bin good to know ya.'"


    He changed the line to:

    "At 7 p.m., it grew dark, it was then he said,
    'Fellas, it's bin good to know ya.'"
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  34. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    There is a sobering YouTube video online that starts with Roger Mudd reporting on the wreck for CBS News, then uses the Lightfoot song over footage of the Fitz being launched, in service, and on the bottom of Lake Superior.

    See it here: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald
     
  35. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Six years. How time flies!
     
  36. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    It's been seven years since this thread was originally posted, so in honor of the 29 souls who went down with The Fitz, I'm bumping this thread for the 39th Anniversary of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald.

     
    jpanzenhagen likes this.
  37. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    This is the 40th Anniversary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. In honor of the loss of the Fitz and her 29 crew members, I am bumping this thread. It's become an annual tradition.
     
  38. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Today is the 42nd Anniversary of the tragic end to the Edmund Fitzgerald. By popular demand, here is a bump of this thread for all of you. I apologize for the missing graphics. Photobucket is holding the photos hostage in an attempt to demand tribute, which I refuse to pay. Overall, the story is there. RIP, Fitz and crew.
     
  39. The_Kitchen_Guy

    The_Kitchen_Guy Legend Member Silver Member

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    Today marks the 43rd Anniversary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. The legend lives on, as Gordon Lightfoot told us, and this is my annual bump of this thread.

    RIP Fitz and Crew.
     
    chefjeanine likes this.
  40. mspibb

    mspibb Member Gold Member

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    It’s a great song and a fitting tribute to the ship and crew!
     
    Nov 14, 2018
    #40
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