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Flea Market and Fairs

Jan 30, 2006
11
0
I haven't done a fair of any sort but in the next 3 weeks I have 3.
I am really excited because they are all different. Plus I am really needing help with bookings.

The first one I am doing is a Flea Market. It is a 2 day event and happens every month. It's only $45 so I thought what do I have to lose. They have new vendors and bargain vendors so I am not sure how I will do. I am thinking of taking a few new pieces and stoneware pieces that I have bought. I will sell them for the retail price but I won't charge s/h.

My question for the Flea Market is what items do you take when you have fairs to sale.

I also have an event at a local hospital for a Girls Day out. All I have to do is donate a $50 item. So I am thinking about concentrating on how Stoneware and our Cookware you can cook light because you are not adding oil. Something showing the healthy side of cooking at home.

Then I have a Bridal Event the very next day in April. I have found lots of ideas on the board here for Bridal Events.

I love this board and wish I knew about it alot sooner.

Thanks everyone.:)
 

etteluap70PC

Legacy Member
Gold Member
May 24, 2005
3,665
2
keep it simple

I have done lots of fairs with mixed success. The Most Important thing I have learned it to Keep My Dispaly SIMPLE!!! It not only makes set up and take down easier it is ot too overwhelming for passers by. Take the basics, upcomming host specials at least one piece if cookware and stoneware.
If they ask for a catalog ask them to fill out a drawing slip while you get one from your brief case.
Keep any special offers you are doing simple!
EX: Book your April Show with me today get the cookbook of your choice FREE!
Be ready for negativity as well as excitement. People allways want to tell you what bad thing happend to them with another consultant. Do your best to make them feel better, but do not bad mouth the other cons. no matter what you may be thinking.
Be excited about PC it is contagious. Do not sit behind your table. Smile!

Good Luck!
 

BethCooks4U

Legend Member
Gold Member
Jan 21, 2005
13,007
42
My display table includes: basics from the starter kit (stone, chopper, cheese grater...), a piece of simple additions, piece of glazed stoneware, a woven selections piece, a piece of cookware...

I have a wedding cake I made for my bridal showers made from the white PC towels which I now put on my display table with Wedding Registry marketing cards from Merrill. It gets their attention and opens the conversation to the registry and theme shows! I also use the flip board (from the supply list on PP) to have flyers handy with upcoming specials, recruiting info, fundraiser info, etc. I bring recipes, opportunity flyers and business cards to give out and a mini catalog (or a full catalog from last season) and my calendar (if they book a show or a recruiting interview they get a new catalog). If someone asks for information about something special I answer their questions and then promise to drop off or mail the information to them - gives me an excuse to get in touch later.

Everyone who approaches my table is encouraged to enter my drawing but I put the slips in a covered bowl at the back of my table so I can quick add a note to the back of it to help me remember something about the person.

As far as things for sale. I might bring some season's best cookbooks with me but that's about it. I point out that I can't possibly know what people will want to get today and besides it's easier for them - they don't want to be carrying a ton of stuff around.


Note: I used to make up lots of different flyers to give out but I got very little feedback from them. Some gave too much information out at once and most, I'm sure, got tossed when they got home. Most people keep recipes and they will take a minute to look at something that is quick and easy to look over like PC's flyers. Saves me time and effort and gets better results!
 

pamperedbecky

Legacy Member
May 6, 2005
4,488
0
These are all great suggestions! Every year we do booths at various county fairs. I really agree with not sitting behind your table. Matter of fact, at the booths we do at fairs, the tables are at the back and sides of our booth so we can't go behind the table. We actually try to stand the whole time! It makes you more approachable and it's easier for people to come "in" and browse the products. That makes it easier to strike up conversations with people too. I usually start out by asking someone "Are you familiar with Pampered Chef?" You can usually tell when someone just totally doesn't want to talk to you, so I respect this and quiet down after I initially talk to them. You could also talk to people starting with more of an open-ended question so they're not just saying "yes" or "no" to your questions. Maybe something like "Tell me what you know about The Pampered Chef..." or something like that. Bring some of the Replacement Parts Order Form with you because you'll undoubtedly get people mentioning broken products and they are always appreciative if it's something that can have a part replaced. Then you can give them the form and they can send it in themselves.

Definitely do a drawing, but even something small will attract attention. Offer a free cooking show as part of the prize. Then once you get all the entries, call all (or as many as you want) of them and say they won a free cooking show. You'll supply the ingredients, plates, cups, etc. I've gotten a number of shows this way after fairs and booths.

Good luck! Let us know how it goes!:D
 

BethCooks4U

Legend Member
Gold Member
Jan 21, 2005
13,007
42
Yes, I agree totally with Becky! Never stay behind the table. I usually stand the whole time too! The door prize I use is a $10 gift certificate that is worth $25 if they book a show. I also give runner-up door prizes of free shows.


One additional piece of advice: don't attack people as they walk by. Welcome them into your booth - remember you want them to welcome you into their home! - and start a casual conversation.
 
Mar 2, 2006
17
0
I just worked a home and garden show this weekend. we had our tables set up in a big U shape in the sides and back of the area. I then stood towards the front of our setup and just said hello to everyone that walked by. If they somewhat hesitated, I would tell them I was giving away free recipes today (from the supply order form) and then tell them about our drawing for the weekend. Most of them would then sign up and look at the tables. It seemed to segway into conversations without being very pushy. After walking through the fair, I feel that we were one of the most friendly booths. I didn't work a ton but got some great leads this way!
 
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