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Host Coaching A VERY FORWARD comment

sivlepa

Member
Feb 22, 2006
59
0
Before I begin, I must say that as a prelude, I get annoyed when my shows don't start on time, due to the host, waiting for guests etc. And although I've started to just step in and start them sooner than later now, it still happens.

Nonetheless, I did a host coaching call tonight; 1 of 3. She told me that she'd prefer the presentation be short and sweet so her friends can visit and shop. I was speechless. I felt offended, as I try to make my demo's an hour max. But this always depends on so many variables: how things are flowing, guest questions, latecomers etc. The show from which this gal booked had a fairly late start, although the host kept insisting we wait. Also, the guests at this particular show were very loud and interruptive. So I am assuming that my current host may have got a negative view about my presentations from this. She told me she was hoping for it to not be longer than an hour. I almost feel like saying at her show, "Tonight we'll keep this short and sweet as per "JANE's" request. Therefore, I will do my demo fairly quickly, but if you have any questions for me afterward, I'd be happy to help you then." On the other hand, I felt like saying to this host, "Listen, I'll do my thing and just deal with it."

I can't believe she told me that! Anyone else ever experience something similar? It's hard to not take these sorts of things a bit personally.
:confused:
 
A

AFwife

Guest
sivlepa said:
Before I begin, I must say that as a prelude, I get annoyed when my shows don't start on time, due to the host, waiting for guests etc. And although I've started to just step in and start them sooner than later now, it still happens.

Nonetheless, I did a host coaching call tonight; 1 of 3. She told me that she'd prefer the presentation be short and sweet so her friends can visit and shop. I was speechless. I felt offended, as I try to make my demo's an hour max. But this always depends on so many variables: how things are flowing, guest questions, latecomers etc. The show from which this gal booked had a fairly late start, although the host kept insisting we wait. Also, the guests at this particular show were very loud and interruptive. So I am assuming that my current host may have got a negative view about my presentations from this. She told me she was hoping for it to not be longer than an hour. I almost feel like saying at her show, "Tonight we'll keep this short and sweet as per "JANE's" request. Therefore, I will do my demo fairly quickly, but if you have any questions for me afterward, I'd be happy to help you then." On the other hand, I felt like saying to this host, "Listen, I'll do my thing and just deal with it."

I can't believe she told me that! Anyone else ever experience something similar? It's hard to not take these sorts of things a bit personally.
:confused:


Maybe she just doesn't want the show to take forever and being that the demonstration part is the BULK of it, she just wants to cut it short.

Just an tip, cause I've cut my shows short as far as the demonstration goes cause I work three jobs and I'm just to tired to stand up there for 4 hours. LOL

Tip: arrive an hour early to host house and prepare most of the food ahead of time. For example, if you were making the Chicken Club Wreath, chop up all but one chicken breast, all but one bacon and slice up all but one plum tomato. That way all you have to demonstrate is the ONE that is left of each and the measuring stuff like, showing how to use the measure all cup with the mayo and the measuring spoons with the mustard. Get what I mean?

Because of this early preparation I have found that I then I more time to play a few games and answer more questions.

Don't take offense to her request, it really probaby was just her not wanting to have a long party.

Oh and YES I have had the same request twice however this coming from hostess that have booked more then once with me and they know the drill so they rather just cut to the chase cause it's the same guest as well. LOL
 

PampChefJoy

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Jul 18, 2005
1,816
8
As annoying as comments like that are, and as frustrating as shows like the first one was, we still have to keep in mind that we consultants are there to assist the host in putting on a great party and earning benefits. If the host wants short and sweet, I give it to her. If the guests start chatting amongst themselves, I let them... and tell them I'll be available to help them when they're ready to check out. As much as I've wanted to throw in snide comments, I just grin and bear it and try to be as professional as possible.

Believe it or not, some of my higher $$ shows have been express shows where everything is prepared ahead of time and I give a brief 15 minute rundown and let them visit instead. Especially if guests have been to a full kitchen/now cooking show in the past, they may not be inclined to sit through another presentation, especially if in the same season or just a few weeks after the last one.

Try not to take it personally. If the hostess truly didn't like the way you did your show, she would not have booked a party with you!
 

DZmom

Veteran Member
Jun 20, 2005
1,070
2
I have 2 hosts like that!!

I know the feeling. Right now I've got 2 hosts like that. The funny this is they booked off the sweetest woman I've ever met. BUT these 2 are ALWAYS telling me how to do my demo and what I need to talk about and how to arrange my stuff. I'd recruit them both, but they neither one want to work since they are older as they put it. I just grit my teeth and bear it. So, I can muddle through it. HOPEFULLY, one of the 5 potential recruits from the first show will sign and I won't have to deal with these 2 ladies anymore. I love them to death, but really if you want to do the show YOUR way, BUY THE APRON!
 
Oct 21, 2005
23
0
My host for this Thursday just asked me that!

This is the first time someone has actually asked me to keep it short in order to "keep her friends' attention."

I wasn't offended but at first I did feel something weird! I think I'm going to do like AFWife says and prepare everything ahead of time. There's that wonderful potato demo that I got from this web site that I'm going to do that shows many tools. It's quick but shows many things. I'm also going to highlight a few of the new items but will have them displayed for people to look at after the demo. And just announce that since Suzie hostess requested a short demo, please feel free to ask many questions during our one-on-one time. I also tell them to ask each other questions while they're waiting for their turn. It is amazing how many in the crowd are only missing the apron (and the paycheck) to go along with what they know! They often sell things to each other!

I only do one demo and many consultants in my area do two and have longer demos. You wouldn't believe how many bookings I get from people who say "I want to book a show from you, your demo didn't take all night." They really do appreciate us taking less time.
 

fruit76loop

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Sep 13, 2005
1,161
0
Maybe...

you are taking her comment too personal. ;) I have been to many shows where the consultant drags the show on and on....people get bored, tired and mad. And by the time the show is over, all I want to do is get out of there!

I personally keep my demo time at 45 minutes! I have my timer set, if it goes off and I am still demoing products, I let the crowd know that I have been a big mouth and my time limit is up. :D I tell them quickly the remaining steps and let them know that they are welcome to ask any questions about any of the products I didn't have time to talk about. People always comment on how great the show was and how they are glad that I respect their time.

I wouldn't take these comments personal. This is the host's show, not yours. Just take her comment as a reminder to keep things short and sweet!:D
 
M

MicheleC

Guest
I agree

Marlene,

I agree that it is easy to let a show drag on and I have been to other parties where I'm just wanting to get home. I try to keep my demo to 45 minutes and to start on time as well. Ideally, I want to be in and out including set up in 2 hours. I like the idea of setting the timer! It let's people know you really respect their time. I'm going to start using that at my shows.

Thanks for the idea!

Michele
 

beepampered

Veteran Member
Oct 22, 2005
1,145
1
two hours

wow - in and out in two hours - that's great! I have been telling my hosts that they should plan on two hours like this:

We always start late cause no one ever arrives on time (15 mins gone)
I will have the food in the oven in about 45 minutes and then finish a few other items (1 hour)
Eat food and order (30-1 hour depending on group)

I tell them this when we set the time and no one has complained yet. I tell them that I don't think we could expect anyone to stay for more than two hours but if they want to linger that's fine.

I'm still working the kinks out but actually discussing the flow of the show and what they expect (some ladies actually want to hang out longer it seems) before I go there helps me mentally prepare for giving her and her friends what she wants.

It's been fun learning (I started in Nov) what motivates people to have a party. The products seem to be lower on the list than I would have thought originally. Keeping the motives in mind (obviously for the host in the original post it was to visit with friends) helps me stay focused on her needs and not mine...BEE
 
A

AFwife

Guest
My very first show was 4 hours long. :eek:

My second 3 and then that's when I decided to go early so I can chop half the demonstration up ahead of time and now my shows are 2 1/2 max. :D
 
M

MicheleC

Guest
BEE It sounds like..

you're close to the 2 hour mark. You definately can't control how long people want to stay and talk. I used to feel like I needed to stay until everyone was gone. Now after visiting with them and making sure their questions are answered I let them know I will be packing up and they can come see me when they are ready to place their orders or if they have any questions. I don't do my dishes at the show so I'm usually still in the same area they are.

Generally I arrive 30 minutes ahead of time. I have become much more efficient at my set up time since I started in September when I wandered around not sure where I was going to put everything:D . I also do some prep before leaving home where I list the things I am going to need during my demo so when I'm unpacking I know what I need on my table. I really strive to start on time and will usually only give about 5 minutes to latecomers. I talk about starting on time during host coaching. I do a 5 minute opening, demo about 30 minutes depending on recipe. While it is cooking I go over cookware, simple additions, stoneware, booking, recruiting and new products if those either were not done during the demo or not in depth. I explain the drawing slips during that time as well. After the food comes out and is served, I circulate with guests answering questions, taking orders and talking about bookings/opportunity.

I know when I'm at a show, part of the reason I am coming is to visit with my friends and enjoy my time out...not to listen to someone else talk so I am trying to limit my time. I also love to talk so if I don't make a conscious effort I could go on forever!:D

It's great that you discuss the flow with your hosts. Communication is key!

I hope you're enjoying your business as much as I am!
 

chefkeri

Member
Oct 3, 2005
277
1
Been there too...

I've had my largest show with a host & guests who were totally ignoring me! It was "young mom's" night out. The host wanted me to make 3 recipes..:eek: She wanted me to FEED her guests.... all 39 of them!:confused:

I made one complete pizza during my hour prep. Then made tomato basil squares & another pizza during my demo. No one listened. So, I just kept working and the ones who had questions came up to ask & the others ate.

It was my first time that this happened. My demo usually is 45- 1hr. I have since learned that tickets for prizes help keep large guests interested -- better.

The host... well that's another tread all together. :p

I wouldn't be insulted. I'd be happy to get in/out in 2 hours instead of my usual 3-4. Especially if I've traveled farther to the party.

Try not to take host's requests too personally. To me, it's like when you recieve a NO! or "please remove" from my newsletter list... there are many others who say YES & I loved this month's email!

Good Luck!:D
 
Oct 17, 2005
6
0
Venting Time!!!

I must say that I agree with all the other posts about hosts not starting on time for whatever reason, guests showing up late, those who bring kids not having the courtesy to retreive the product back from the child as they run away with it from my display, etc.

I'm feeling really annoyed right now and I guess I just need some thoughts from the rest of you fantastic folks out there! Last night I had a show that was to begin at 6:30pm. Well, I showed up shortly after 5pm to set up and my host wasn't ready for anything at all. Seriously...nothing was done, nor ready. We discussed doing the Hazelnut Cake and thank goodness she got the ingredients, but nothing else was ready. Her house was a disaster, the kitchen had stuff everywhere and nothing was ready for me to do my pre-show setting up because it was a disaster! Anyway, I helped her clean things up and get some of her appetizers ready, but at 6:15 the first two guests arrived and none of my stuff was set up. I felt completely exhausted and stressed as I usually like to be ready early so I can mingle and answer questions.

Well, to make a long story short, the show got started at 7:15pm. She never came out of the kitchen until that time because she was prepping stuff. I managed to quickly set up my stuff...and mingle a bit, but I feel as though I was taken advantage of. Am I wrong for thinking this? I think she expected me to come and help her with everything and maybe she forgot that I was there to do business. I'm confident my slightly over $200 show could have been better. I host coached with her...but nothing was right. What are your thoughts???:confused:
 

Chef Diane

Member
Feb 28, 2006
498
0
I think we have all had hostess' and shows like these, but we can't let them get us down. We deffinately have more up days than down.

My suggestion for starting late is DONT. When making your host coaching calls let your host know that you Will be starting on time and when she makes her reminder calls to let her guests know that. I would normally give about 5 min, then say something like..."ok we're going to get started now. I know everyone isn't here, but you are and I don't want to keep You waiting". or you can start with..."ok we're going to start with the introductions while we wait for the others to arrive". By the time you finish the intros they have forgotten about the others LOL

Remember, they were there on time no reason to penalize them. As long as your host & her guests knew this up front there isn't a problem.


I am so sorry for what happened to you rossjulie, I have never had that one happen to me, so I don't know how it feels, but Im sure it was awful.
 

amya

Member
Mar 10, 2005
411
0
One thing I have heard to get guests to show up on time, is to fill out the invites with a start time of 6:58 pm or something like that. Make sure to write something on the invite like, "Be on time to be entered in a drawing for a free prize." Then, only the guests that make it by 6:58 get their names in a hat for a free gift. I haven't tried it myself, but it might be a good idea.

One thing that I do to keep demo time down is let the guests make their own treat. At my last show, I made the Berries 'n Cream Wantons. I had made the wanton part at home before I left for the show. Then at the show, I went over the products involved in making the filling and topping (we sliced strawberries with the Egg Slicer) and then let each guest come and make their own wanton cup. I would say that from start to finish, the demo maybe only took 30-45 minutes - and this includes my story about why I started with PC and the prize drawing.
 

rennea

Legacy Member
Gold Member
Jul 23, 2005
3,733
0
I had a host that asked me to clean her kitchen with her when a got there to set up:mad: I told her "that was alright she could do that while I set up". I did the demo from the dining room table and just took the wreath in the kitchen when it was time to put it in the oven. Her kitchen was so dirty there was used Q-tips on the floor. I nearly had a heart attack. I can't believe she thought I was her maid too.:eek:
 

pampered1224

Legacy Member
Silver Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,791
41
I've been lucky but...

I never started on time until I did one thing. I set the start time to one half hour before I, and I stress I, wanted to start. If the host and I set a start time of 7 p.m. I tell the Host I am going to put 6:30 on the invites and that is the time she needs to tell everyone. This does several things. 1) It assures me that the host is going to be ready in most cases. 2) I get a chance to set up and then relax and then I mingle with the guests who apparently were taught some manners and 3) I can answer their questions ahead of time with out being rushed. It really sets a whole different tone for the show. The other thing you can do is to just automatically realize you WILL start late. Know your start time on the invites then realize that you will have an extra 15 to 30 minutes. You decide. You do this by setting your limits. If you know you want to be gone by 9:30, your show takes one hour, order taking takes 30 minutes and the packing takes 15 that's 7:45 p.m. You set your start time at 7:15 but 7:00 on the invites. This allows you about 15 minutes of flex time. If you do this, you stay in control! Simply work backwards from your out time.
 
R

RachelNguyen

Guest
rossjulie said:
I must say that I agree with all the other posts about hosts not starting on time for whatever reason, guests showing up late, those who bring kids not having the courtesy to retreive the product back from the child as they run away with it from my display, etc.

I'm feeling really annoyed right now and I guess I just need some thoughts from the rest of you fantastic folks out there! Last night I had a show that was to begin at 6:30pm. Well, I showed up shortly after 5pm to set up and my host wasn't ready for anything at all. Seriously...nothing was done, nor ready. We discussed doing the Hazelnut Cake and thank goodness she got the ingredients, but nothing else was ready. Her house was a disaster, the kitchen had stuff everywhere and nothing was ready for me to do my pre-show setting up because it was a disaster! Anyway, I helped her clean things up and get some of her appetizers ready, but at 6:15 the first two guests arrived and none of my stuff was set up. I felt completely exhausted and stressed as I usually like to be ready early so I can mingle and answer questions.

Well, to make a long story short, the show got started at 7:15pm. She never came out of the kitchen until that time because she was prepping stuff. I managed to quickly set up my stuff...and mingle a bit, but I feel as though I was taken advantage of. Am I wrong for thinking this? I think she expected me to come and help her with everything and maybe she forgot that I was there to do business. I'm confident my slightly over $200 show could have been better. I host coached with her...but nothing was right. What are your thoughts???:confused:

Oof. I had a show like that last month. It barely made it over $200 and I am SURE that if there hadn't been 8 kids screaming and constant interruptions and endless distractions it might have been a more successful show. I was utterly exhausted afterwards. The ONLY saving grace was that the Host bought a skillet, so I got some panorama points!

I just chalked it up and moved on... ended up having a great month!

Love+
Rachel
 

Kelley Sells

Member
Feb 2, 2006
348
0
Tic Tac Toe

One of the wonderful consultants on here had a posting of TIC TAC TOE....and I copied it and because i buy the ingredients for my hosts, I changed one square to say "Have space in home set up where you would like me to do our cooking show".....

It's really an awesome "to do list" and they are rewarded for it....I might try it with the teenager.....:D :eek:
 

jwpamp

Veteran Member
Jan 13, 2006
1,646
1
Most of the groups I work with have 3/4 who have been to a show before, and 1/4 who have never been. It is a great disservice to the ones who have not been to a show before, or those who want to learn some new ideas to rush through it.

I show certain things ALWAYS...the US&G, Food Chopper, Stones and Cookware. However, I am not a Catering Company. I make one main dish and if they have more than 10 in attendance and 5 outside orders, I will make a skillet cake.

If you want to see something I didn't show, book a show and I will bring it to your show! My show average is over $800. Because I tell them up front what my policies are, my hostesses don't seem to have a problem with it. It is my business and I have "Policies". It is my "Policy" to start my shows on time...it is my "Policy" to make one or two recipes (if the stipulations are met)...take control!

It is a customer service business, but it is YOUR business! Be kind, but firm. Make a list of Policies and stick to them!
 
Last edited:
Mar 24, 2006
17
0
"There's that wonderful potato demo that I got from this web site that I'm going to do that shows many tools. It's quick but shows many things."

Okay what is this potato demo your talking about, I must have missed this.

I would just smile and do as the hostess/host asks. Who knows you might sell more than ever! Be positive and smile.
 
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